Handel, wissenstransfer und netzwerke. Eine fallstudie zu grenzen und möglichkeiten unternehmerischen handelns unter Juden zwischen reich, Italien und Levante um 1600

Translated title of the contribution: Trade, transfer of knowledge and networks. A case study on limiting and possibilities of entreprising trade under Jews between Empire, Italy and Levant around 1600

Daniel Juette

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    Abstract

    The study of networks constitutes a seminal albeit intricate task for the historian of Jewish economic life in the early modern period. The article illustrates this complexity, revisiting the case of the Italian-Jewish inventor and entrepreneur Mag(g)ino Gabrielli (1561-?) who has been dismissed by some historians as a 'shadowy figure'. A careful examination of his networks, using previously neglected sources, offers a different picture. For example, the article suggests that this Jewish entrepreneur became one of the main purveyors of glass for some of the most prestigious construction sites of the Counter-Reformation in Rome in the 1580s. Furthermore, the article addresses later chapters in Maggino's life, such as his appointment as first consul of the Jews of Livorno (Leghorn) in 1591 and the formation of a Jewish Levant Company in the Holy Roman Empire in the late 1590s. Again, the importance of far-flung networks cannot be overlooked in the case of the Levant Company, and it is suggested that the Italiano Maggino established ties with prominent Sephardic and Levantine Jews of his day, among them Daniel Rodriga. Maggino's trade company thus sheds new light on the role of Ashkenazi and Italian Jews in the early modern trade with the Levant. Moreover, Maggino's attempt to use the office of the consul in order to merge political and economical power within Jewish communities in the Empire may be considered as an anticipation of the role of the court Jew.

    Original languageGerman
    Pages (from-to)263-290
    Number of pages28
    JournalVierteljahresschrift fur Sozial und Wirtschaftsgeschichte
    Volume95
    Issue number3
    StatePublished - 2008

    Fingerprint

    Jew
    Italy
    entrepreneur
    historian
    Holy Roman Empire
    knowledge
    reformation
    examination
    community
    economics
    Knowledge Transfer
    Jews
    Knowledge transfer
    Consuls
    Historian
    Entrepreneurs
    Jewish Community
    Economics
    Rome
    1580s

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • History
    • Economics, Econometrics and Finance (miscellaneous)
    • Sociology and Political Science
    • Cultural Studies

    Cite this

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    title = "Handel, wissenstransfer und netzwerke. Eine fallstudie zu grenzen und m{\"o}glichkeiten unternehmerischen handelns unter Juden zwischen reich, Italien und Levante um 1600",
    abstract = "The study of networks constitutes a seminal albeit intricate task for the historian of Jewish economic life in the early modern period. The article illustrates this complexity, revisiting the case of the Italian-Jewish inventor and entrepreneur Mag(g)ino Gabrielli (1561-?) who has been dismissed by some historians as a 'shadowy figure'. A careful examination of his networks, using previously neglected sources, offers a different picture. For example, the article suggests that this Jewish entrepreneur became one of the main purveyors of glass for some of the most prestigious construction sites of the Counter-Reformation in Rome in the 1580s. Furthermore, the article addresses later chapters in Maggino's life, such as his appointment as first consul of the Jews of Livorno (Leghorn) in 1591 and the formation of a Jewish Levant Company in the Holy Roman Empire in the late 1590s. Again, the importance of far-flung networks cannot be overlooked in the case of the Levant Company, and it is suggested that the Italiano Maggino established ties with prominent Sephardic and Levantine Jews of his day, among them Daniel Rodriga. Maggino's trade company thus sheds new light on the role of Ashkenazi and Italian Jews in the early modern trade with the Levant. Moreover, Maggino's attempt to use the office of the consul in order to merge political and economical power within Jewish communities in the Empire may be considered as an anticipation of the role of the court Jew.",
    author = "Daniel Juette",
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    AB - The study of networks constitutes a seminal albeit intricate task for the historian of Jewish economic life in the early modern period. The article illustrates this complexity, revisiting the case of the Italian-Jewish inventor and entrepreneur Mag(g)ino Gabrielli (1561-?) who has been dismissed by some historians as a 'shadowy figure'. A careful examination of his networks, using previously neglected sources, offers a different picture. For example, the article suggests that this Jewish entrepreneur became one of the main purveyors of glass for some of the most prestigious construction sites of the Counter-Reformation in Rome in the 1580s. Furthermore, the article addresses later chapters in Maggino's life, such as his appointment as first consul of the Jews of Livorno (Leghorn) in 1591 and the formation of a Jewish Levant Company in the Holy Roman Empire in the late 1590s. Again, the importance of far-flung networks cannot be overlooked in the case of the Levant Company, and it is suggested that the Italiano Maggino established ties with prominent Sephardic and Levantine Jews of his day, among them Daniel Rodriga. Maggino's trade company thus sheds new light on the role of Ashkenazi and Italian Jews in the early modern trade with the Levant. Moreover, Maggino's attempt to use the office of the consul in order to merge political and economical power within Jewish communities in the Empire may be considered as an anticipation of the role of the court Jew.

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