Towards development of a circuit based treatment for impaired memory: A multidisciplinary approach

Erik W. Anderson, Gilbert A. Preston, Cláudio T. Silva

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The previous decade saw progress in our understanding of fundamental neural systems of the brain, particularly those sub-serving memory. For example, it is now recognized that individual power and peak frequency attributes of alpha band rhythms predict performance on a working memory task. Additionally, investigators using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), a safe and non-invasive means of stimulating the awake and alert human brain, have shown TMS can mimic long-term potentiation (LTP), widely considered the neurophysiologic substrate of memory. Based on this earlier work, we designed a combined TMS-EEG study of the effects of 10Hz rTMS on psychomotor processing speed, an index of neural efficiency, on a well validated short-term verbal recognition memory task, the Sternberg. We predicted first, that compared with sham 10Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) would significantly reduce psychomotor processing speed indexed as reaction time (RT). Second, we predicted that improvement in RT would be associated with a 10Hz rTMS induced increase in pre-task alpha power and pre-task alpha band phase synchrony.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 3rd International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering
Pages302-305
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007
Event3rd International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering - Kohala Coast, HI, United States
Duration: May 2 2007May 5 2007

Other

Other3rd International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering
CountryUnited States
CityKohala Coast, HI
Period5/2/075/5/07

Fingerprint

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Data storage equipment
Networks (circuits)
Brain
Reaction Time
Therapeutics
Processing
Electroencephalography
Alpha Rhythm
Long-Term Potentiation
Short-Term Memory
Substrates
Research Personnel
Efficiency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering
  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Anderson, E. W., Preston, G. A., & Silva, C. T. (2007). Towards development of a circuit based treatment for impaired memory: A multidisciplinary approach. In Proceedings of the 3rd International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (pp. 302-305). [4227276] https://doi.org/10.1109/CNE.2007.369671

Towards development of a circuit based treatment for impaired memory : A multidisciplinary approach. / Anderson, Erik W.; Preston, Gilbert A.; Silva, Cláudio T.

Proceedings of the 3rd International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering. 2007. p. 302-305 4227276.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Anderson, EW, Preston, GA & Silva, CT 2007, Towards development of a circuit based treatment for impaired memory: A multidisciplinary approach. in Proceedings of the 3rd International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering., 4227276, pp. 302-305, 3rd International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, Kohala Coast, HI, United States, 5/2/07. https://doi.org/10.1109/CNE.2007.369671
Anderson EW, Preston GA, Silva CT. Towards development of a circuit based treatment for impaired memory: A multidisciplinary approach. In Proceedings of the 3rd International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering. 2007. p. 302-305. 4227276 https://doi.org/10.1109/CNE.2007.369671
Anderson, Erik W. ; Preston, Gilbert A. ; Silva, Cláudio T. / Towards development of a circuit based treatment for impaired memory : A multidisciplinary approach. Proceedings of the 3rd International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering. 2007. pp. 302-305
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