Tissue-specific mutagenesis by N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine as the basis for urothelial carcinogenesis

Zhiming He, Wieslawa Kosinska, Zhong Lin Zhao, Xue Ru Wu, Joseph Guttenplan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Bladder cancer is one of the few cancers that have been linked to carcinogens in the environment and tobacco smoke. Of the carcinogens tested in mouse chemical carcinogenesis models, N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) is one that reproducibly causes high-grade, invasive cancers in the urinary bladder, but not in any other tissues. However, the basis for such a high-level tissue-specificity has not been explored. Using mutagenesis in lacI (Big Blue™) mice, we show here that BBN is a potent mutagen and it causes high-level of mutagenesis specifically in the epithelial cells (urothelial) of the urinary bladder. After a 2-6-week treatment of 0.05% BBN in the drinking water, mutagenesis in urothelial cells of male and female mice was about two orders of magnitude greater than the spontaneous mutation background. In contrast, mutagenesis in smooth muscle cells of the urinary bladder was about five times lower than in urothelial tissue. No appreciable increase in mutagenesis was observed in kidney, ureter, liver or forestomach. In lacI (Big Blue™) rats, BBN mutagenesis was also elevated in urothelial cells, albeit not nearly as profoundly as in mice. This provides a potential explanation as to why rats are less prone than mice to the formation of aggressive form of bladder cancer induced by BBN. Our results suggest that the propensity to BBN-triggered mutagenesis of urothelial cells underlies its heightened susceptibility to this carcinogen and that mutagenesis induced by BBN represents a novel model for initiation of bladder carcinogenesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)92-95
Number of pages4
JournalMutation Research - Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis
Volume742
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 18 2012

Fingerprint

Butylhydroxybutylnitrosamine
Mutagenesis
Carcinogenesis
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms
Carcinogens
Urinary Bladder
Chemical Models
Organ Specificity
Mutagens
Ureter
Smoke
Drinking Water
Smooth Muscle Myocytes
Tobacco
Epithelial Cells
Kidney

Keywords

  • Bladder cancer
  • Carcinogenesis
  • Mutagenesis
  • N-nitroso-n-butyl-n-hydroxy-n-butylnitrosamine
  • Urothelial carcinoma
  • Urothelium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Genetics

Cite this

Tissue-specific mutagenesis by N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine as the basis for urothelial carcinogenesis. / He, Zhiming; Kosinska, Wieslawa; Zhao, Zhong Lin; Wu, Xue Ru; Guttenplan, Joseph.

In: Mutation Research - Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis, Vol. 742, No. 1-2, 18.02.2012, p. 92-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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