There's no place like home: Examining the emotional consequences of Hurricane Katrina on the displaced residents of New Orleans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Using survey data from the Displaced New Orleans Residents Pilot Study (DNORPS), I examine the emotional consequences of Hurricane Katrina on the displaced residents of New Orleans. First, I employ an established framework within disaster research to investigate whether the stress level of displaced residents varies by race, income, and gender. As the residents in this dataset remained uprooted from their homes, I also examine three housing variables, including homeownership status, house type, and four levels of home damage. Contrary to previous research, home damage and homeownership status are significant predictors of displaced residents' emotional distress while the effect of race disappears. These findings suggest that future research on the mental health of disaster survivors, especially for displaced residents, expand the traditional analytical framework to consistently include housing variables, especially different categories of home damage, in addition to race, income, and gender.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1222-1235
Number of pages14
JournalSocial Science Research
Volume42
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013

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resident
damages
disaster
housing
income
gender
mental health

Keywords

  • Disaster
  • Gender
  • Home damage
  • Income
  • Mental health
  • Race

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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abstract = "Using survey data from the Displaced New Orleans Residents Pilot Study (DNORPS), I examine the emotional consequences of Hurricane Katrina on the displaced residents of New Orleans. First, I employ an established framework within disaster research to investigate whether the stress level of displaced residents varies by race, income, and gender. As the residents in this dataset remained uprooted from their homes, I also examine three housing variables, including homeownership status, house type, and four levels of home damage. Contrary to previous research, home damage and homeownership status are significant predictors of displaced residents' emotional distress while the effect of race disappears. These findings suggest that future research on the mental health of disaster survivors, especially for displaced residents, expand the traditional analytical framework to consistently include housing variables, especially different categories of home damage, in addition to race, income, and gender.",
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