Theory of real computation according to EGC

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The Exact Geometric Computation (EGC) mode of computation has been developed over the last decade in response to the widespread problem of numerical non-robustness in geometric algorithms. Its technology has been encoded in libraries such as LEDA, CGAL and Core Library. The key feature of EGC is the necessity to decide zero in its computation. This paper addresses the problem of providing a foundation for the EGC mode of computation. This requires a theory of real computation that properly addresses the Zero Problem. The two current approaches to real computation are represented by the analytic school and algebraic school. We propose a variant of the analytic approach based on real approximation. To capture the issues of representation, we begin with a reworking of van der Waerden's idea of explicit rings and fields. We introduce explicit sets and explicit algebraic structures. Explicit rings serve as the foundation for real approximation: our starting point here is not ℝ, but ⊆ℝ an explicit ordered ring extension of ℤ that is dense in ℝ. We develop the approximability of real functions within standard Turing machine computability, and show its connection to the analytic approach. Current discussions of real computation fail to address issues at the intersection of continuous and discrete computation. An appropriate computational model for this purpose is obtained by extending Schönhage's pointer machines to support both algebraic and numerical computation. Finally, we propose a synthesis wherein both the algebraic and the analytic models coexist to play complementary roles. Many fundamental questions can now be posed in this setting, including transfer theorems connecting algebraic computability with approximability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationReliable Implementation of Real Number Algorithms: Theory and Practice - International Seminar, Revised Papers
Pages193-237
Number of pages45
Volume5045 LNCS
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008
EventInternational Seminar on Reliable Implementation of Real Number Algorithms: Theory and Practice - Dagstuhl Castle, Germany
Duration: Jan 8 2006Jan 13 2006

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume5045 LNCS
ISSN (Print)03029743
ISSN (Electronic)16113349

Other

OtherInternational Seminar on Reliable Implementation of Real Number Algorithms: Theory and Practice
CountryGermany
CityDagstuhl Castle
Period1/8/061/13/06

Fingerprint

Exact Geometric Computation
Libraries
Technology
Approximability
Computability
Ring
Geometric Algorithms
Turing Machine
Zero
Approximation
Algebraic Structure
Numerical Computation
Computational Model
Turing machines
Intersection
Synthesis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Theoretical Computer Science

Cite this

Yap, C. (2008). Theory of real computation according to EGC. In Reliable Implementation of Real Number Algorithms: Theory and Practice - International Seminar, Revised Papers (Vol. 5045 LNCS, pp. 193-237). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 5045 LNCS). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-85521-7_12

Theory of real computation according to EGC. / Yap, Chee.

Reliable Implementation of Real Number Algorithms: Theory and Practice - International Seminar, Revised Papers. Vol. 5045 LNCS 2008. p. 193-237 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 5045 LNCS).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Yap, C 2008, Theory of real computation according to EGC. in Reliable Implementation of Real Number Algorithms: Theory and Practice - International Seminar, Revised Papers. vol. 5045 LNCS, Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 5045 LNCS, pp. 193-237, International Seminar on Reliable Implementation of Real Number Algorithms: Theory and Practice, Dagstuhl Castle, Germany, 1/8/06. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-85521-7_12
Yap C. Theory of real computation according to EGC. In Reliable Implementation of Real Number Algorithms: Theory and Practice - International Seminar, Revised Papers. Vol. 5045 LNCS. 2008. p. 193-237. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-85521-7_12
Yap, Chee. / Theory of real computation according to EGC. Reliable Implementation of Real Number Algorithms: Theory and Practice - International Seminar, Revised Papers. Vol. 5045 LNCS 2008. pp. 193-237 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
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