Theory-Based Analysis of Interest in an HIV Vaccine for Reasons Indicative of Risk Compensation Among African American Women

Julia E. Painter, Brandie S. Temple, Laura A. Woods, Carrie Cwiak, Lisa B. Haddad, Mark J. Mulligan, Ralph DiClemente

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Licensure of an HIV vaccine could reduce or eliminate HIV among vulnerable populations. However, vaccine effectiveness could be undermined by risk compensation (RC), defined by an increase in risky behavior due to a belief that the vaccine will confer protection. Interest in an HIV vaccine for reasons indicative of RC may serve as an indicator of actual RC in a postlicensure era. This study assessed factors associated with interest in an HIV vaccine for reasons indicative of RC among African American women aged 18 to 55 years, recruited from a hospital-based family planning clinic in Atlanta, Georgia (N = 321). Data were collected using audio-computer–assisted surveys. Survey items were guided by risk homeostasis theory and social cognitive theory. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess determinants of interest in an HIV vaccine for reasons indicative of RC. Thirty-eight percent of the sample expressed interest in an HIV vaccine for at least one reason indicative of RC. In the final model, interest in an HIV vaccine for reasons indicative of RC was positively associated with higher impulsivity, perceived benefits of sexual risk behaviors, and perceived benefits of HIV vaccination; it was negatively associated with having at least some college education, positive future orientation, and self-efficacy for sex refusal. Results suggest that demographic, personality, and theory-based psychosocial factors are salient to wanting an HIV vaccine for reasons indicative of RC, and underscore the need for risk-reduction counseling alongside vaccination during the eventual rollout of an HIV vaccine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)444-453
Number of pages10
JournalHealth Education and Behavior
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018

Fingerprint

AIDS Vaccines
African Americans
Vaccination
Vaccines
HIV
AIDS/HIV
African American Women
Indicative
Vaccine
Impulsive Behavior
Family Planning Services
Vulnerable Populations
Self Efficacy
Risk Reduction Behavior
Licensure
Risk-Taking
Sexual Behavior
Personality
Counseling
Homeostasis

Keywords

  • comparative theory
  • HIV vaccine
  • risk compensation
  • risk homeostasis theory
  • social cognitive theory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Theory-Based Analysis of Interest in an HIV Vaccine for Reasons Indicative of Risk Compensation Among African American Women. / Painter, Julia E.; Temple, Brandie S.; Woods, Laura A.; Cwiak, Carrie; Haddad, Lisa B.; Mulligan, Mark J.; DiClemente, Ralph.

In: Health Education and Behavior, Vol. 45, No. 3, 01.06.2018, p. 444-453.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Painter, Julia E. ; Temple, Brandie S. ; Woods, Laura A. ; Cwiak, Carrie ; Haddad, Lisa B. ; Mulligan, Mark J. ; DiClemente, Ralph. / Theory-Based Analysis of Interest in an HIV Vaccine for Reasons Indicative of Risk Compensation Among African American Women. In: Health Education and Behavior. 2018 ; Vol. 45, No. 3. pp. 444-453.
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