The Women and Their Children's Health (WaTCH) study: Methods and design of a prospective cohort study in Louisiana to examine the health effects from the BP oil spill

Edward S. Peters, Ariane L. Rung, Megan H. Bronson, Meghan M. Brashear, Lauren C. Peres, Symielle Gaston, Samaah M. Sullivan, Kate Peak, David Abramson, Elizabeth T.H. Fontham, Daniel Harrington, Evrim Oral, Edward J. Trapido

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill is the largest marine oil spill in US history. Few studies have evaluated the potential health effects of this spill on the Gulf Coast community. The Women and Their Children's Health (WaTCH) study is a prospective cohort designed to investigate the midterm to long-term physical, mental and behavioural health effects of exposure to the oil spill. Participants Women were recruited by telephone from pre-existing lists of individuals and households using an address-based sampling frame between 2012 and 2014. Baseline interviews obtained information on oil spill exposure, demographics, physical and mental health, and health behaviours. Women were also asked to provide a household roster, from which a child between 10 and 17 years was randomly selected and recruited into a child substudy. Telephone respondents were invited to participate in a home visit in which blood samples, anthropometrics and neighbourhood characteristics were measured. A follow-up interview was completed between 2014 and 2016. Findings to date 2852 women completed the baseline interview, 1231 of whom participated in the home visit, and 628 children participated in the child's health substudy. The follow-up interview successfully reinterviewed 2030 women and 454 children. Future plans WaTCH continues to conduct follow-up surveys, with a third wave of interviews planned in 2017. Also, we are looking to enhance the collection of spatially related environmental data to facilitate assessment of health risks in the study population. In addition, opportunities to participate in behavioural interventions for subsets of the cohort have been initiated. There are ongoing studies that examine the relationship between genetic and immunological markers with mental health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere014887
JournalBMJ Open
Volume7
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

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Petroleum Pollution
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Interviews
Health
Mental Health
House Calls
Telephone
Health Behavior
Genetic Markers
Child Health
History
Demography
Population

Keywords

  • Disaster Epidemiology
  • Environmental Epidemiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The Women and Their Children's Health (WaTCH) study : Methods and design of a prospective cohort study in Louisiana to examine the health effects from the BP oil spill. / Peters, Edward S.; Rung, Ariane L.; Bronson, Megan H.; Brashear, Meghan M.; Peres, Lauren C.; Gaston, Symielle; Sullivan, Samaah M.; Peak, Kate; Abramson, David; Fontham, Elizabeth T.H.; Harrington, Daniel; Oral, Evrim; Trapido, Edward J.

In: BMJ Open, Vol. 7, No. 7, e014887, 01.07.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Peters, ES, Rung, AL, Bronson, MH, Brashear, MM, Peres, LC, Gaston, S, Sullivan, SM, Peak, K, Abramson, D, Fontham, ETH, Harrington, D, Oral, E & Trapido, EJ 2017, 'The Women and Their Children's Health (WaTCH) study: Methods and design of a prospective cohort study in Louisiana to examine the health effects from the BP oil spill', BMJ Open, vol. 7, no. 7, e014887. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2016-014887
Peters, Edward S. ; Rung, Ariane L. ; Bronson, Megan H. ; Brashear, Meghan M. ; Peres, Lauren C. ; Gaston, Symielle ; Sullivan, Samaah M. ; Peak, Kate ; Abramson, David ; Fontham, Elizabeth T.H. ; Harrington, Daniel ; Oral, Evrim ; Trapido, Edward J. / The Women and Their Children's Health (WaTCH) study : Methods and design of a prospective cohort study in Louisiana to examine the health effects from the BP oil spill. In: BMJ Open. 2017 ; Vol. 7, No. 7.
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AU - Bronson, Megan H.

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AU - Peres, Lauren C.

AU - Gaston, Symielle

AU - Sullivan, Samaah M.

AU - Peak, Kate

AU - Abramson, David

AU - Fontham, Elizabeth T.H.

AU - Harrington, Daniel

AU - Oral, Evrim

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AB - Purpose The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill is the largest marine oil spill in US history. Few studies have evaluated the potential health effects of this spill on the Gulf Coast community. The Women and Their Children's Health (WaTCH) study is a prospective cohort designed to investigate the midterm to long-term physical, mental and behavioural health effects of exposure to the oil spill. Participants Women were recruited by telephone from pre-existing lists of individuals and households using an address-based sampling frame between 2012 and 2014. Baseline interviews obtained information on oil spill exposure, demographics, physical and mental health, and health behaviours. Women were also asked to provide a household roster, from which a child between 10 and 17 years was randomly selected and recruited into a child substudy. Telephone respondents were invited to participate in a home visit in which blood samples, anthropometrics and neighbourhood characteristics were measured. A follow-up interview was completed between 2014 and 2016. Findings to date 2852 women completed the baseline interview, 1231 of whom participated in the home visit, and 628 children participated in the child's health substudy. The follow-up interview successfully reinterviewed 2030 women and 454 children. Future plans WaTCH continues to conduct follow-up surveys, with a third wave of interviews planned in 2017. Also, we are looking to enhance the collection of spatially related environmental data to facilitate assessment of health risks in the study population. In addition, opportunities to participate in behavioural interventions for subsets of the cohort have been initiated. There are ongoing studies that examine the relationship between genetic and immunological markers with mental health.

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