The validity of tooth grinding measures: etiology of pain dysfunction syndrome revisited.

J. J. Marbach, Karen Raphael, B. P. Dohrenwend, M. C. Lennon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The current study explores the proposition that a treating clinician's etiologic model influences patients' reports of tooth grinding, the validity of, and subsequent research findings relying on these measures. The investigation compares self-reports of tooth grinding and related clinical variables for 151 cases of temporomandibular pain and dysfunction syndrome (TMPDS) treated by a clinician who does not explicitly support the grinding theory of the etiology of TMPDS, and 139 healthy controls. Cases were no more likely than well controls to report ever-grinding, but were actually significantly less likely than well controls to report current grinding. They were also significantly more likely to report that a dentist had told them they ground. Findings suggest that studies using self-report, clinician-report of tooth grinding (or both) are methodologically inadequate for addressing the relationship between tooth grinding and TMPDS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)327-333
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Dental Association
Volume120
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 1990

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Tooth
Pain
Self Report
Dentists
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

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The validity of tooth grinding measures : etiology of pain dysfunction syndrome revisited. / Marbach, J. J.; Raphael, Karen; Dohrenwend, B. P.; Lennon, M. C.

In: Journal of the American Dental Association, Vol. 120, No. 3, 03.1990, p. 327-333.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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