The uninsured and the benefits of medical progress

Sharon Glied, Sarah E. Little

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In a recent Health Affairs article, David Cutler and Mark McClellan found that new medical technology confers positive net benefits for several conditions, including heart attacks, cataracts, and depression. We estimate the extent to which uninsured Americans ages 55-64 use these technologies and compute access gaps for each. Based on Cutler and McClellan's net benefit estimates, we calculate that more than $1.1 billion is lost annually from excess morbidity and mortality among the uninsured population because of lack of access to new technologies for the treatment of these three conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)210-219
Number of pages10
JournalHealth Affairs
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003

Fingerprint

heart attack
medical technology
morbidity
new technology
mortality
Technology
lack
health
Cataract
Myocardial Infarction
Morbidity
Mortality
Health
Population
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

The uninsured and the benefits of medical progress. / Glied, Sharon; Little, Sarah E.

In: Health Affairs, Vol. 22, No. 4, 2003, p. 210-219.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Glied, Sharon ; Little, Sarah E. / The uninsured and the benefits of medical progress. In: Health Affairs. 2003 ; Vol. 22, No. 4. pp. 210-219.
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