The True Size of Government

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Abstract

"This book addresses a seemingly simple question: Just how many people work for the federal government anyway? Congress and the president almost always answer the question by counting the number of full-time civil servants, which totaled 1.9 million when President Clinton declared the era of big government over in 1996. But, according to Paul Light, the true head count that year was nearly nine times higher than the official numbers, with about 17 million people delivering goods and services on the government's behalf. Most of those employees are part of what Light calls the "shadow of government"--Nonfederal employees working under federal contracts, grants, and mandates to state and local governments
Original languageEnglish (US)
Place of PublicationWashington, D.C
PublisherBrookings Institution
Number of pages238
ISBN (Print)0815752652, 0815752660, 9780815752653, 9780815752660
StatePublished - 1999

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president
employee
civil servant
Federal Government
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Keywords

  • Overheid
  • Civil service
  • Government consultants
  • Uitbesteding van werk
  • United States
  • Employees
  • Overheidspersoneel
  • Personeelssterkte
  • Conseillers du gouvernement
  • Opdrachten (algemeen)
  • Fonction publique
  • États-Unis

Cite this

Light, P. C. (1999). The True Size of Government. Washington, D.C: Brookings Institution.

The True Size of Government. / Light, Paul Charles.

Washington, D.C : Brookings Institution, 1999. 238 p.

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Light, PC 1999, The True Size of Government. Brookings Institution, Washington, D.C.
Light PC. The True Size of Government. Washington, D.C: Brookings Institution, 1999. 238 p.
Light, Paul Charles. / The True Size of Government. Washington, D.C : Brookings Institution, 1999. 238 p.
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