The souls of black folk

Thought and afterthought

Shamoon Zamir

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    … A combination of social problems is far more than a matter of mere addition;-the combination itself is a problem. W. E. B. Du Bois, The Philadelphia Negro (1899) The subtitle of The Souls of Black Folk is "Essays and Sketches." Together, the title and subtitle indicate a collection which offers the reader variations upon a theme. The fourteen chapters which comprise the main body of the book were written between 1897 and 1903. Nine had been published previously in various journals and magazines before being revised for inclusion in Souls. Taken together, the fourteen chapters range across social, political, and economic history, religion and education, psychology, the sociology of music, autobiography, and fiction. But Souls is more than simply a collection of essays and fiction held loosely together by a focus on the broad common ground of African American historical experience and contemporary life. It is a "combination" but one which is more than "mere addition." In bringing together the disparate pieces, in revising the already published ones, and in ordering and framing them in particular ways, Du Bois transfigured them, so that Souls became a literary work which is greater than the sum of its parts. In its opening lines Souls announces the problem which is its first subject: "the color-line" as a border which, in its very divisiveness, is constitutive of modernity. The present essay argues that the book’s literary achievement lies above all in creating a form in which understanding can only grasp the scope and nature of the problem of race and modernity, its confounding knottiness, by passing through its own undoing and leaving behind the established academic and journalistic conventions of social analysis.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationThe Cambridge Companion to W. E. B. Du Bois
    PublisherCambridge University Press
    Pages7-36
    Number of pages30
    ISBN (Electronic)9781139001939
    ISBN (Print)9780521871518
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

    Fingerprint

    Folk
    Subtitles
    Fiction
    Modernity
    Social Problems
    Literary Works
    Reader
    Psychology Education
    Inclusion
    W. E. B. Du Bois
    Social Analysis
    Political History
    Autobiography
    Religion
    African Americans
    Sociology of music
    Historical Experience
    Social History
    Economic History
    Negroes

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Arts and Humanities(all)

    Cite this

    Zamir, S. (2008). The souls of black folk: Thought and afterthought. In The Cambridge Companion to W. E. B. Du Bois (pp. 7-36). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CCOL9780521871518.002

    The souls of black folk : Thought and afterthought. / Zamir, Shamoon.

    The Cambridge Companion to W. E. B. Du Bois. Cambridge University Press, 2008. p. 7-36.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Zamir, S 2008, The souls of black folk: Thought and afterthought. in The Cambridge Companion to W. E. B. Du Bois. Cambridge University Press, pp. 7-36. https://doi.org/10.1017/CCOL9780521871518.002
    Zamir S. The souls of black folk: Thought and afterthought. In The Cambridge Companion to W. E. B. Du Bois. Cambridge University Press. 2008. p. 7-36 https://doi.org/10.1017/CCOL9780521871518.002
    Zamir, Shamoon. / The souls of black folk : Thought and afterthought. The Cambridge Companion to W. E. B. Du Bois. Cambridge University Press, 2008. pp. 7-36
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