The social construction of acid rain. Some implications for science/ policy assessment

Charles Herrick, Dale Jamieson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    There is currently a great deal of discussion in various national and international fora about how to design global change research programmes (for an overview of part of the terrain see Price).1 American policy analysts often invoke the National Acid Precipitation Project (NAPAP) as a textbook example of how not to do policy relevant research (see for example US Congress, Office of Technology Assessment2). We fear that the wrong conclusions are being drawn from the NAPAP experience. In this paper we re-examine NAPAP with a view towards discovering what this experience can teach us about global change research initiatives.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)105-112
    Number of pages8
    JournalGlobal Environmental Change
    Volume5
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 1995

    Fingerprint

    social construction
    acid precipitation
    science policy
    acid rain
    global change
    textbook
    research policy
    research program
    experience
    anxiety
    policy
    project
    science

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Ecology
    • Global and Planetary Change
    • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
    • Geography, Planning and Development
    • Environmental Science(all)

    Cite this

    The social construction of acid rain. Some implications for science/ policy assessment. / Herrick, Charles; Jamieson, Dale.

    In: Global Environmental Change, Vol. 5, No. 2, 1995, p. 105-112.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Herrick, Charles ; Jamieson, Dale. / The social construction of acid rain. Some implications for science/ policy assessment. In: Global Environmental Change. 1995 ; Vol. 5, No. 2. pp. 105-112.
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