The scanning electron microscope in craniofacial remodeling research

application of the topographic principle.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Growth and development studies utilizing craniofacial skeletal material are best done by documenting evidence of the bone growth mechanisms responsible for morphogenesis. One primary mechanism is remodeling which involves coordinated bone resorption and deposition in localized areas. Some histological studies have been performed on human facial remodeling, but these studies have been limited in extent because of the destructive nature of the technique. For obvious reasons, large skeletal research collections cannot be utilized in histological work. A new technique is presented which does not damage specimens. This involves making high resolution replicas of subadult craniofacial bone which are then examined with the scanning electron microscope (SEM) for evidence of the characteristic microscopic surface topography of remodeling bone. The Topographic ("T") principle is introduced as a precedent for discriminating remodeling bone activity states with the SEM. These activity states in vivo specify characteristic microscopic surface topographies. The three distinctive surfaces are resorptive, depository, and resting. These surfaces can be mapped on a coordinate representation of the bone replica to obtain results which are similar to those of histological studies. Application of the "T" principle and SEM/replica methodological approach offers great promise to the study of craniofacial morphogenesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)143-153
Number of pages11
JournalProgress in Clinical and Biological Research
Volume101
StatePublished - 1982

Fingerprint

Bone Remodeling
Electrons
Morphogenesis
Research
Bone and Bones
Bone Development
Bone Resorption
Growth and Development

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{77b351f3983b438bbf1684e853d35661,
title = "The scanning electron microscope in craniofacial remodeling research: application of the topographic principle.",
abstract = "Growth and development studies utilizing craniofacial skeletal material are best done by documenting evidence of the bone growth mechanisms responsible for morphogenesis. One primary mechanism is remodeling which involves coordinated bone resorption and deposition in localized areas. Some histological studies have been performed on human facial remodeling, but these studies have been limited in extent because of the destructive nature of the technique. For obvious reasons, large skeletal research collections cannot be utilized in histological work. A new technique is presented which does not damage specimens. This involves making high resolution replicas of subadult craniofacial bone which are then examined with the scanning electron microscope (SEM) for evidence of the characteristic microscopic surface topography of remodeling bone. The Topographic ({"}T{"}) principle is introduced as a precedent for discriminating remodeling bone activity states with the SEM. These activity states in vivo specify characteristic microscopic surface topographies. The three distinctive surfaces are resorptive, depository, and resting. These surfaces can be mapped on a coordinate representation of the bone replica to obtain results which are similar to those of histological studies. Application of the {"}T{"} principle and SEM/replica methodological approach offers great promise to the study of craniofacial morphogenesis.",
author = "Timothy Bromage",
year = "1982",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "101",
pages = "143--153",
journal = "Progress in Clinical and Biological Research",
issn = "0361-7742",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The scanning electron microscope in craniofacial remodeling research

T2 - application of the topographic principle.

AU - Bromage, Timothy

PY - 1982

Y1 - 1982

N2 - Growth and development studies utilizing craniofacial skeletal material are best done by documenting evidence of the bone growth mechanisms responsible for morphogenesis. One primary mechanism is remodeling which involves coordinated bone resorption and deposition in localized areas. Some histological studies have been performed on human facial remodeling, but these studies have been limited in extent because of the destructive nature of the technique. For obvious reasons, large skeletal research collections cannot be utilized in histological work. A new technique is presented which does not damage specimens. This involves making high resolution replicas of subadult craniofacial bone which are then examined with the scanning electron microscope (SEM) for evidence of the characteristic microscopic surface topography of remodeling bone. The Topographic ("T") principle is introduced as a precedent for discriminating remodeling bone activity states with the SEM. These activity states in vivo specify characteristic microscopic surface topographies. The three distinctive surfaces are resorptive, depository, and resting. These surfaces can be mapped on a coordinate representation of the bone replica to obtain results which are similar to those of histological studies. Application of the "T" principle and SEM/replica methodological approach offers great promise to the study of craniofacial morphogenesis.

AB - Growth and development studies utilizing craniofacial skeletal material are best done by documenting evidence of the bone growth mechanisms responsible for morphogenesis. One primary mechanism is remodeling which involves coordinated bone resorption and deposition in localized areas. Some histological studies have been performed on human facial remodeling, but these studies have been limited in extent because of the destructive nature of the technique. For obvious reasons, large skeletal research collections cannot be utilized in histological work. A new technique is presented which does not damage specimens. This involves making high resolution replicas of subadult craniofacial bone which are then examined with the scanning electron microscope (SEM) for evidence of the characteristic microscopic surface topography of remodeling bone. The Topographic ("T") principle is introduced as a precedent for discriminating remodeling bone activity states with the SEM. These activity states in vivo specify characteristic microscopic surface topographies. The three distinctive surfaces are resorptive, depository, and resting. These surfaces can be mapped on a coordinate representation of the bone replica to obtain results which are similar to those of histological studies. Application of the "T" principle and SEM/replica methodological approach offers great promise to the study of craniofacial morphogenesis.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0020346061&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0020346061&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 101

SP - 143

EP - 153

JO - Progress in Clinical and Biological Research

JF - Progress in Clinical and Biological Research

SN - 0361-7742

ER -