The rule of law and the enforcement of the law

Workers' understanding of labor rights in the central highlands of Guatemala

Liliana R. Goldín, Courtney Dowdall

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Research with hundreds of mostly indigenous Maya workers in the export processing plants (maquilas) of highland Guatemala has revealed a disconnect between working conditions in the factories, perceived rights, national and international labor laws, and law enforcement. Because of this disjunction, efforts to address the plight of workers must engage the complex conditions of the current labor regimes. Maquilas operate in contexts that are virtually exempt from regulation and conflate national and global orders, precluding a clear perspective on issues of rights and legal claims. In the new geographies of power, workers in transnational factories fall into the interstices between state and nonstate spaces and lose their rights and entitlements in the process.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)133-154
    Number of pages22
    JournalLatin American Perspectives
    Volume39
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Nov 1 2012

    Fingerprint

    Guatemala
    constitutional state
    labor
    factory
    worker
    international labor law
    Law
    legal claim
    law enforcement
    working conditions
    geography
    regulation
    rights
    enforcement

    Keywords

    • Guatemala
    • Industrial work
    • Labor laws
    • Maquilas
    • Workers' rights

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Geography, Planning and Development
    • Sociology and Political Science

    Cite this

    The rule of law and the enforcement of the law : Workers' understanding of labor rights in the central highlands of Guatemala. / Goldín, Liliana R.; Dowdall, Courtney.

    In: Latin American Perspectives, Vol. 39, No. 6, 01.11.2012, p. 133-154.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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