The role of social support in the psychological well-being of African American girls who experience dating violence victimization

Laura F. Salazar, Gina M. Wingood, Ralph DiClemente, Delia L. Lang, Kathy Harrington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The goals of this study were to test the relationship between dating violence victimization (i.e., verbal, emotional, and physical abuse) and psychological well-being (i.e., depressive symptomatology, self-esteem, and body image) among 522 African American girls, and to determine whether social support acted as a buffer of negative effects (moderator) or as an intervening factor (mediator) in the relationship between dating violence victimization and psychological well-being. Results from structural equation modeling indicated that dating violence victimization was associated with negative psychological outcomes. Although social support did not moderate this relationship, it served as a mediator of the relationship between dating violence victimization and psychological well-being. Dating violence programs for African American girls should consider how to incorporate family, church, and other networks in the community to foster support, and allow adolescent girls to discuss their abusive experiences in a nonblaming environment. If programs are able to buoy girls who experience dating violence, then they may be able to ameliorate the associated negative psychological sequelae.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)171-187
Number of pages17
JournalViolence and Victims
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2004

Fingerprint

Crime Victims
Social Support
African Americans
victimization
social support
well-being
violence
Psychology
experience
body image
Body Image
moderator
Self Concept
self-esteem
American
Intimate Partner Violence
Buffers
abuse
church
adolescent

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Health(social science)
  • Law

Cite this

The role of social support in the psychological well-being of African American girls who experience dating violence victimization. / Salazar, Laura F.; Wingood, Gina M.; DiClemente, Ralph; Lang, Delia L.; Harrington, Kathy.

In: Violence and Victims, Vol. 19, No. 2, 01.04.2004, p. 171-187.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Salazar, Laura F. ; Wingood, Gina M. ; DiClemente, Ralph ; Lang, Delia L. ; Harrington, Kathy. / The role of social support in the psychological well-being of African American girls who experience dating violence victimization. In: Violence and Victims. 2004 ; Vol. 19, No. 2. pp. 171-187.
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