The relationship of e-cigarette use to cigarette quit attempts and cessation

Insights from a large, nationally representative U.S. Survey

David T. Levy, Zhe Yuan, Yuying Luo, David Abrams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: While cessation from cigarettes is a top priority for public health, controversy surrounds the role of e-cigarettes for quitting cigarettes. This study examines the role of e-cigarettes in quit attempts and 3-month cigarette abstinence using a large, recent nationally representative US sample. Methods: Data from the 2014/15 Tobacco Use Supplement-Current Population Survey (TUS-CPS) on cigarette and e-cigarette use and individual characteristics were supplemented with information on state tobacco control policies. We estimated frequencies and multivariate logistic equations for making a quit attempt among those who smoked 1 year earlier and for remaining abstinent at least 3 months among those making a quit attempt. These two outcomes were related to demographic characteristics, tobacco control policies and different frequency measures of e-cigarette use (ever, at least 1, 5, 20 of the last 30 days, a continuous measure of days use). Results: Having made a quit attempt was more likely among smokers using e-cigarettes than non-users. Among those making at least one quit attempt, quit success was lower among ever users, but higher among those with at least 5 days use of e-cigarettes in the last month. Both quit attempts and quit success were linearly related to the frequency of e-cigarette use. Conclusions: Consistent with randomized trials and those observational studies that measure frequency of e-cigarette use, both quit attempts and quit success were positively associated with increased frequency of e-cigarette use. Frequency of e-cigarette use was important in gauging the nature of these relationships. Implications: Previous studies have obtained mixed results regarding the relationship of e-cigarette use to cigarette smoking cessation. This study provides a more precise methodology for considering the relationship of e-cigarette use to quit attempts and to quit success, and finds that quit attempts and quit success increase with the number of days use in the past month.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)931-939
Number of pages9
JournalNicotine and Tobacco Research
Volume20
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Tobacco Products
Surveys and Questionnaires
Tobacco
Tobacco Use
Smoking Cessation
Observational Studies
Public Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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The relationship of e-cigarette use to cigarette quit attempts and cessation : Insights from a large, nationally representative U.S. Survey. / Levy, David T.; Yuan, Zhe; Luo, Yuying; Abrams, David.

In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research, Vol. 20, No. 8, 01.01.2018, p. 931-939.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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