The relationship between ethnic identity and Chlamydia and Gonorrhea infections among low-income detained African American adolescent females

Dexter R. Voisin, Laura F. Salazar, Richard Crosby, Ralph J. Diclemente

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study explored the relationship between ethnic identity and Chlamydia and Gonorrhea infections among detained African American female adolescents. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 123 African American female adolescents within eight detention facilities in Georgia. Using audio-computer assisted self-interviewing technology, data were collected on demographics, ethnic identity, laboratory-confirmed Chlamydia and Gonorrhea, and other known correlates for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), such as socioeconomic status, parental monitoring, and risky sexual behaviors. Rates of Chlamydia and Gonorrhea testing yielded incidence rates of 22.6% and 4.3%, respectively. Findings indicated that, controlling for STI correlates, participants who indicated high ethnic identity were 4.3 times more likely to test positive for an STI compared to those scoring low on the measure of ethnic identity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)355-362
Number of pages8
JournalPsychology, Health and Medicine
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2013

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Keywords

  • African American females
  • STIs
  • detainees
  • ethnic identity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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