The red-ox status of a penicillin-binding protein is an on/off switch for spore peptidoglycan synthesis in Bacillus subtilis: MicroCommentary

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Abstract

Thiol-disulphide oxidoreductases catalyse the formation or breakage of disulphide bonds to control the red-ox status of a variety of proteins. Their activity is compartmentalized, as exemplified by the distinct roles these enzymes play in the cytoplasm and periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, an article from Lars Hederstedt and collaborators at Lund University sheds light on another member of this superfamily of proteins, the thioredoxin-like protein StoA from Bacillus subtilis. Interestingly, StoA function is required in yet another subcellular compartment: the intermembrane space that separates forespores from mother cells in endospore-forming bacteria. Specifically, this study demonstrates that the high-molecular-weight penicillin-binding protein SpoVD, which contains two exposed cysteine residues and whose extracellular domain is located in the intermembrane space, is a substrate of StoA. As formation of a disulphide bond most likely inactivates SpoVD activity, the converse breakage of that bond in a process catalysed by StoA appears to be the trigger that initiates peptidoglycan synthesis in sporulating cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)10-12
Number of pages3
JournalMolecular Microbiology
Volume75
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2010

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Penicillin-Binding Proteins
Peptidoglycan
Bacillus subtilis
Spores
Disulfides
Endospore-Forming Bacteria
Protein Disulfide Reductase (Glutathione)
Periplasm
Thioredoxins
Proteins
Microbiology
Gram-Negative Bacteria
Cysteine
Cytoplasm
Stem Cells
Molecular Weight
Enzymes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Microbiology

Cite this

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title = "The red-ox status of a penicillin-binding protein is an on/off switch for spore peptidoglycan synthesis in Bacillus subtilis: MicroCommentary",
abstract = "Thiol-disulphide oxidoreductases catalyse the formation or breakage of disulphide bonds to control the red-ox status of a variety of proteins. Their activity is compartmentalized, as exemplified by the distinct roles these enzymes play in the cytoplasm and periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, an article from Lars Hederstedt and collaborators at Lund University sheds light on another member of this superfamily of proteins, the thioredoxin-like protein StoA from Bacillus subtilis. Interestingly, StoA function is required in yet another subcellular compartment: the intermembrane space that separates forespores from mother cells in endospore-forming bacteria. Specifically, this study demonstrates that the high-molecular-weight penicillin-binding protein SpoVD, which contains two exposed cysteine residues and whose extracellular domain is located in the intermembrane space, is a substrate of StoA. As formation of a disulphide bond most likely inactivates SpoVD activity, the converse breakage of that bond in a process catalysed by StoA appears to be the trigger that initiates peptidoglycan synthesis in sporulating cells.",
author = "Patrick Eichenberger",
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N2 - Thiol-disulphide oxidoreductases catalyse the formation or breakage of disulphide bonds to control the red-ox status of a variety of proteins. Their activity is compartmentalized, as exemplified by the distinct roles these enzymes play in the cytoplasm and periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, an article from Lars Hederstedt and collaborators at Lund University sheds light on another member of this superfamily of proteins, the thioredoxin-like protein StoA from Bacillus subtilis. Interestingly, StoA function is required in yet another subcellular compartment: the intermembrane space that separates forespores from mother cells in endospore-forming bacteria. Specifically, this study demonstrates that the high-molecular-weight penicillin-binding protein SpoVD, which contains two exposed cysteine residues and whose extracellular domain is located in the intermembrane space, is a substrate of StoA. As formation of a disulphide bond most likely inactivates SpoVD activity, the converse breakage of that bond in a process catalysed by StoA appears to be the trigger that initiates peptidoglycan synthesis in sporulating cells.

AB - Thiol-disulphide oxidoreductases catalyse the formation or breakage of disulphide bonds to control the red-ox status of a variety of proteins. Their activity is compartmentalized, as exemplified by the distinct roles these enzymes play in the cytoplasm and periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, an article from Lars Hederstedt and collaborators at Lund University sheds light on another member of this superfamily of proteins, the thioredoxin-like protein StoA from Bacillus subtilis. Interestingly, StoA function is required in yet another subcellular compartment: the intermembrane space that separates forespores from mother cells in endospore-forming bacteria. Specifically, this study demonstrates that the high-molecular-weight penicillin-binding protein SpoVD, which contains two exposed cysteine residues and whose extracellular domain is located in the intermembrane space, is a substrate of StoA. As formation of a disulphide bond most likely inactivates SpoVD activity, the converse breakage of that bond in a process catalysed by StoA appears to be the trigger that initiates peptidoglycan synthesis in sporulating cells.

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