The radio nebula produced by the 27 December 2004 giant flare from SGR 1806-20

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

On 27 December 2004, just the third giant flare was observed from a magnetar, in this case SGR 1806-20. This giant flare was the most energetic of the three, and analysis of a Very Large Array observation of SGR 1806-20 after the giant flare revealed the existence of a new, bright, transient radio source at its position. Follow-up radio observations of this source determined that initially, this source underwent a mildly relativistic one-sided expansion which ceased at the same time as a temporary rebrightening of the radio source. These observational results imply that the radio emission is powered by ∼ 10 24 g of baryonic material which was ejected off the surface on the neutron star during the giant flare.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-42
Number of pages4
JournalAstrophysics and Space Science
Volume308
Issue number1-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2007

Fingerprint

nebulae
flares
radio
magnetars
Very Large Array (VLA)
radio observation
radio emission
neutron stars
energetics
expansion

Keywords

  • Pulsars: general
  • Pulsars: individual SGR 1806-20

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

The radio nebula produced by the 27 December 2004 giant flare from SGR 1806-20. / Gelfand, Joseph (Yosi).

In: Astrophysics and Space Science, Vol. 308, No. 1-4, 01.04.2007, p. 39-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{0e7647effab146d7b67a531476761f10,
title = "The radio nebula produced by the 27 December 2004 giant flare from SGR 1806-20",
abstract = "On 27 December 2004, just the third giant flare was observed from a magnetar, in this case SGR 1806-20. This giant flare was the most energetic of the three, and analysis of a Very Large Array observation of SGR 1806-20 after the giant flare revealed the existence of a new, bright, transient radio source at its position. Follow-up radio observations of this source determined that initially, this source underwent a mildly relativistic one-sided expansion which ceased at the same time as a temporary rebrightening of the radio source. These observational results imply that the radio emission is powered by ∼ 10 24 g of baryonic material which was ejected off the surface on the neutron star during the giant flare.",
keywords = "Pulsars: general, Pulsars: individual SGR 1806-20",
author = "Gelfand, {Joseph (Yosi)}",
year = "2007",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10509-007-9317-y",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "308",
pages = "39--42",
journal = "Astrophysics and Space Science",
issn = "0004-640X",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "1-4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The radio nebula produced by the 27 December 2004 giant flare from SGR 1806-20

AU - Gelfand, Joseph (Yosi)

PY - 2007/4/1

Y1 - 2007/4/1

N2 - On 27 December 2004, just the third giant flare was observed from a magnetar, in this case SGR 1806-20. This giant flare was the most energetic of the three, and analysis of a Very Large Array observation of SGR 1806-20 after the giant flare revealed the existence of a new, bright, transient radio source at its position. Follow-up radio observations of this source determined that initially, this source underwent a mildly relativistic one-sided expansion which ceased at the same time as a temporary rebrightening of the radio source. These observational results imply that the radio emission is powered by ∼ 10 24 g of baryonic material which was ejected off the surface on the neutron star during the giant flare.

AB - On 27 December 2004, just the third giant flare was observed from a magnetar, in this case SGR 1806-20. This giant flare was the most energetic of the three, and analysis of a Very Large Array observation of SGR 1806-20 after the giant flare revealed the existence of a new, bright, transient radio source at its position. Follow-up radio observations of this source determined that initially, this source underwent a mildly relativistic one-sided expansion which ceased at the same time as a temporary rebrightening of the radio source. These observational results imply that the radio emission is powered by ∼ 10 24 g of baryonic material which was ejected off the surface on the neutron star during the giant flare.

KW - Pulsars: general

KW - Pulsars: individual SGR 1806-20

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34248185515&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34248185515&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10509-007-9317-y

DO - 10.1007/s10509-007-9317-y

M3 - Article

VL - 308

SP - 39

EP - 42

JO - Astrophysics and Space Science

JF - Astrophysics and Space Science

SN - 0004-640X

IS - 1-4

ER -