The provenance and ramifications of the SCS conflicts

Law, resources, and geopolitics

James Hsiung

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    The South China Sea (SCS) may, by common sense, be assumed to be part of the Pacific Ocean. But, in this book, we treat it as a separate body of waters in its own right, due to its distinctive status arising from a combination of four peculiar factors: (a) its vital importance as a hubbub of trade, since one-third of the world's shipping (valued at $5.3 trillion in 2015) sails through its waters; (b) its abundant resources, including oil and natural gas; (c) the wide attention it commands because of the clashes arising from the neighboring nations' overlapping sovereign claims; and (d) post-2010 U.S. geopolitical interests in the region as a strategic site of rivalry with the rerising China, although largely dressed as a freedom of navigation dispute.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationSeries on Contemporary China
    PublisherWorld Scientific Publishing Co. Pte Ltd
    Pages1-18
    Number of pages18
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

    Publication series

    NameSeries on Contemporary China
    Volume43
    ISSN (Print)1793-0847

    Fingerprint

    geopolitics
    bodies of water
    China
    Law
    natural gas
    shipping
    resources
    water
    Resources
    Geopolitics
    Water
    South China
    Overlapping
    Shipping
    Rivalry
    Dispute
    Common sense
    Natural gas
    Oil
    Navigation

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Sociology and Political Science
    • Political Science and International Relations
    • Cultural Studies
    • Anthropology
    • History
    • Economics, Econometrics and Finance (miscellaneous)

    Cite this

    Hsiung, J. (2018). The provenance and ramifications of the SCS conflicts: Law, resources, and geopolitics. In Series on Contemporary China (pp. 1-18). (Series on Contemporary China; Vol. 43). World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte Ltd. https://doi.org/10.1142/9789813231108_0001

    The provenance and ramifications of the SCS conflicts : Law, resources, and geopolitics. / Hsiung, James.

    Series on Contemporary China. World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte Ltd, 2018. p. 1-18 (Series on Contemporary China; Vol. 43).

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Hsiung, J 2018, The provenance and ramifications of the SCS conflicts: Law, resources, and geopolitics. in Series on Contemporary China. Series on Contemporary China, vol. 43, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte Ltd, pp. 1-18. https://doi.org/10.1142/9789813231108_0001
    Hsiung J. The provenance and ramifications of the SCS conflicts: Law, resources, and geopolitics. In Series on Contemporary China. World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte Ltd. 2018. p. 1-18. (Series on Contemporary China). https://doi.org/10.1142/9789813231108_0001
    Hsiung, James. / The provenance and ramifications of the SCS conflicts : Law, resources, and geopolitics. Series on Contemporary China. World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte Ltd, 2018. pp. 1-18 (Series on Contemporary China).
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