The protective value of school enrolment against sexually transmitted disease

A study of high-risk African American adolescent females

Richard A. Crosby, Ralph DiClemente, Gina M. Wingood, Laura F. Salazar, Eve Rose, Jessica M. Sales

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To identify whether school enrolment is protective against laboratory-confirmed diagnosis of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and against a spectrum of sexual risk factors. Methods: A cross-sectional study of 715 African-American adolescent females (15-21 years old) was conducted. Data collection included an audio-computer-assisted self-interview lasting about 60 min and a self-collected vaginal swab for nucleic acid amplification testing of Trichomonas vaginalis, Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Results: In total, 65% were enrolled in school. After adjusting for age and whether adolescents resided with a family member, those not enrolled were twice as likely to test positive for one of the three STDs compared with those enrolled (adjusted OR2; 95% CI 1.38 to 2.91). Similarly, school enrolment was protective against risk factors contributing to STD acquisition. The measures of sexual risk behaviour of 8 of 10, retained significance after adjusting for the covariates, and 2 of the 3 psychosocial mediators retained significance. Conclusion: This study provides initial evidence suggesting that keeping high-risk African-American adolescent females in school (including forms of school that occur after high-school graduation) may be important from a public health standpoint.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)223-227
Number of pages5
JournalSexually Transmitted Infections
Volume83
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2007

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Sexually Transmitted Diseases
African Americans
Students
Trichomonas vaginalis
Neisseria gonorrhoeae
Clinical Laboratory Techniques
Chlamydia trachomatis
Risk-Taking
Sexual Behavior
Nucleic Acids
Public Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Immunology

Cite this

The protective value of school enrolment against sexually transmitted disease : A study of high-risk African American adolescent females. / Crosby, Richard A.; DiClemente, Ralph; Wingood, Gina M.; Salazar, Laura F.; Rose, Eve; Sales, Jessica M.

In: Sexually Transmitted Infections, Vol. 83, No. 3, 01.06.2007, p. 223-227.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Crosby, Richard A. ; DiClemente, Ralph ; Wingood, Gina M. ; Salazar, Laura F. ; Rose, Eve ; Sales, Jessica M. / The protective value of school enrolment against sexually transmitted disease : A study of high-risk African American adolescent females. In: Sexually Transmitted Infections. 2007 ; Vol. 83, No. 3. pp. 223-227.
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