The prospective contribution of hostility characteristics to high fasting glucose levels

Biing Jiun Shen, Amanda J. Countryman, Avron Spiro, Raymond Niaura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - To assess whether psychological constructs of hostility, anger, type A behavior pattern, and depressive symptom severity 1) were associated with concurrent and prospective fasting glucose levels and 2) whether this association was moderated by marital status. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS -Participants were 485 healthy men ([mean ± SD] age 59 plusmn 7 years) without a history of heart disease, diabetes, or taking related medications in the Veterans Affairs Normative Aging Study. Their fasting glucose levels between 1986 and 1995 were examined. Hierarchical linear regressions were conducted to investigate whether hostility, anger, type A behavior, and depressive symptoms were associated with concurrent fasting glucose levels as well as fasting glucose 9 years later, controlling for standard sociodemographic and biomedical covariates, including baseline fasting glucose, age, education, marital status, BMI, total cholesterol, and systolic blood pressure. RESULTS - Although none of the psychological variables were associated with concurrent fasting glucose, Cook-Medley hostility (β = 0.105), anger (β = 0.091), and type A behavior (β = 0.152) each were associated with prospective fasting glucose 9 years later, controlling for standard covariates. Depressive symptom severity was not associated with either concurrent or follow-up glucose levels. Further analysis showed that marital status moderated the effects of these characteristics on follow-up fasting glucose such that hostility, anger, and type A behavior were significant only among those who were not married (β = 0.348, 0.444, 0.439, respectively; all P <0.001). CONCLUSIONS - Hostility, anger, and type A behavior appear to be independent risk factors for impaired glucose metabolism among unmarried older men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1293-1298
Number of pages6
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume31
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008

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Hostility
Fasting
Glucose
Anger
Marital Status
Depression
Psychology
Blood Pressure
Veterans
Linear Models
Heart Diseases
Research Design
Cholesterol
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

The prospective contribution of hostility characteristics to high fasting glucose levels. / Shen, Biing Jiun; Countryman, Amanda J.; Spiro, Avron; Niaura, Raymond.

In: Diabetes Care, Vol. 31, No. 7, 07.2008, p. 1293-1298.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shen, Biing Jiun ; Countryman, Amanda J. ; Spiro, Avron ; Niaura, Raymond. / The prospective contribution of hostility characteristics to high fasting glucose levels. In: Diabetes Care. 2008 ; Vol. 31, No. 7. pp. 1293-1298.
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