The primacy contest

Why culture matters

Lawrence Mead

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Discussions of whether American primacy will continue focus unduly on specific power differences between the United States and its Asian rivals. Appraisals should also consider institutional capacities. Western regimes have large advantages rooted in cultural differences. Individualism generates stronger economies and governments than the more collective worldviews of the non-West. America will continue to lead mainly because of its far greater willingness to take responsibility for world problems.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)527-532
    Number of pages6
    JournalSociety
    Volume52
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2015

    Fingerprint

    individualism
    worldview
    cultural difference
    regime
    responsibility
    economy

    Keywords

    • American power
    • China
    • International relations
    • Political development

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Social Sciences(all)
    • Sociology and Political Science

    Cite this

    The primacy contest : Why culture matters. / Mead, Lawrence.

    In: Society, Vol. 52, No. 6, 2015, p. 527-532.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Mead, Lawrence. / The primacy contest : Why culture matters. In: Society. 2015 ; Vol. 52, No. 6. pp. 527-532.
    @article{f63369378b224a8d85f7509571a2d5e4,
    title = "The primacy contest: Why culture matters",
    abstract = "Discussions of whether American primacy will continue focus unduly on specific power differences between the United States and its Asian rivals. Appraisals should also consider institutional capacities. Western regimes have large advantages rooted in cultural differences. Individualism generates stronger economies and governments than the more collective worldviews of the non-West. America will continue to lead mainly because of its far greater willingness to take responsibility for world problems.",
    keywords = "American power, China, International relations, Political development",
    author = "Lawrence Mead",
    year = "2015",
    doi = "10.1007/s12115-015-9943-x",
    language = "English (US)",
    volume = "52",
    pages = "527--532",
    journal = "Society",
    issn = "0147-2011",
    publisher = "Springer New York",
    number = "6",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - The primacy contest

    T2 - Why culture matters

    AU - Mead, Lawrence

    PY - 2015

    Y1 - 2015

    N2 - Discussions of whether American primacy will continue focus unduly on specific power differences between the United States and its Asian rivals. Appraisals should also consider institutional capacities. Western regimes have large advantages rooted in cultural differences. Individualism generates stronger economies and governments than the more collective worldviews of the non-West. America will continue to lead mainly because of its far greater willingness to take responsibility for world problems.

    AB - Discussions of whether American primacy will continue focus unduly on specific power differences between the United States and its Asian rivals. Appraisals should also consider institutional capacities. Western regimes have large advantages rooted in cultural differences. Individualism generates stronger economies and governments than the more collective worldviews of the non-West. America will continue to lead mainly because of its far greater willingness to take responsibility for world problems.

    KW - American power

    KW - China

    KW - International relations

    KW - Political development

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84947490666&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84947490666&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1007/s12115-015-9943-x

    DO - 10.1007/s12115-015-9943-x

    M3 - Article

    VL - 52

    SP - 527

    EP - 532

    JO - Society

    JF - Society

    SN - 0147-2011

    IS - 6

    ER -