The predictability of the extratropical stratosphere on monthly time-scales and its impact on the skill of tropospheric forecasts

Om P. Tripathi, Mark Baldwin, Andrew Charlton-Perez, Martin Charron, Stephen D. Eckermann, Edwin Gerber, R. Giles Harrison, David R. Jackson, Baek Min Kim, Yuhji Kuroda, Andrea Lang, Sana Mahmood, Ryo Mizuta, Greg Roff, Michael Sigmond, Seok Woo Son

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Extreme variability of the winter- and spring-time stratospheric polar vortex has been shown to affect extratropical tropospheric weather. Therefore, reducing stratospheric forecast error may be one way to improve the skill of tropospheric weather forecasts. In this review, the basis for this idea is examined. A range of studies of different stratospheric extreme vortex events shows that they can be skilfully forecasted beyond 5 days and into the sub-seasonal range (0-30 days) in some cases. Separate studies show that typical errors in forecasting a stratospheric extreme vortex event can alter tropospheric forecast skill by 5-7% in the extratropics on sub-seasonal time-scales. Thus understanding what limits stratospheric predictability is of significant interest to operational forecasting centres. Both limitations in forecasting tropospheric planetary waves and stratospheric model biases have been shown to be important in this context.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)987-1003
Number of pages17
JournalQuarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society
Volume141
Issue number689
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

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stratosphere
timescale
vortex
weather
polar vortex
planetary wave
winter
forecast

Keywords

  • Seasonal predictability
  • Stratospheric predictability
  • Tropospheric forecast

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

The predictability of the extratropical stratosphere on monthly time-scales and its impact on the skill of tropospheric forecasts. / Tripathi, Om P.; Baldwin, Mark; Charlton-Perez, Andrew; Charron, Martin; Eckermann, Stephen D.; Gerber, Edwin; Harrison, R. Giles; Jackson, David R.; Kim, Baek Min; Kuroda, Yuhji; Lang, Andrea; Mahmood, Sana; Mizuta, Ryo; Roff, Greg; Sigmond, Michael; Son, Seok Woo.

In: Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, Vol. 141, No. 689, 01.04.2015, p. 987-1003.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tripathi, OP, Baldwin, M, Charlton-Perez, A, Charron, M, Eckermann, SD, Gerber, E, Harrison, RG, Jackson, DR, Kim, BM, Kuroda, Y, Lang, A, Mahmood, S, Mizuta, R, Roff, G, Sigmond, M & Son, SW 2015, 'The predictability of the extratropical stratosphere on monthly time-scales and its impact on the skill of tropospheric forecasts', Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, vol. 141, no. 689, pp. 987-1003. https://doi.org/10.1002/qj.2432
Tripathi, Om P. ; Baldwin, Mark ; Charlton-Perez, Andrew ; Charron, Martin ; Eckermann, Stephen D. ; Gerber, Edwin ; Harrison, R. Giles ; Jackson, David R. ; Kim, Baek Min ; Kuroda, Yuhji ; Lang, Andrea ; Mahmood, Sana ; Mizuta, Ryo ; Roff, Greg ; Sigmond, Michael ; Son, Seok Woo. / The predictability of the extratropical stratosphere on monthly time-scales and its impact on the skill of tropospheric forecasts. In: Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society. 2015 ; Vol. 141, No. 689. pp. 987-1003.
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