The power of quantum systems on a line

Dorit Aharonov, Daniel Gottesman, Sandy Irani, Julia Kempe

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We study the computational strength of quantum particles (each of finite dimensionality) arranged on a line. First, we prove that it is possible to perform universal adiabatic quantum computation using a one-dimensional quantum system (with 9 states per particle). Building on the same construction, but with some additional technical effort and 12 states per particle, we show that the problem of approximating the ground state energy of a system composed of a line of quantum particles is QMA-complete; QMA is a quantum analogue of NP. This is in striking contrast to the analogous classical problem, one dimensional MAX-2-SAT with nearest neighbor constraints, which is in P. The proof of the QMA-completeness result requires an additional idea beyond the usual techniques in the area: Some illegal configurations cannot be ruled out by local checks, and are instead ruled out because they would, in the future, evolve into a state which can be seen locally to be illegal. Assuming BQP ≠ QMA, our construction gives a one-dimensional system which takes an exponential time to relax to its ground state at any temperature. This makes it a candidate for a one-dimensional spin glass.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 48th Annual IEEE Symposium on Foundations of Computer Science, FOCS 2007
Pages373-383
Number of pages11
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007
Event48th Annual Symposium on Foundations of Computer Science, FOCS 2007 - Providence, RI, United States
Duration: Oct 20 2007Oct 23 2007

Other

Other48th Annual Symposium on Foundations of Computer Science, FOCS 2007
CountryUnited States
CityProvidence, RI
Period10/20/0710/23/07

Fingerprint

Ground state
Quantum computers
Spin glass
Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Aharonov, D., Gottesman, D., Irani, S., & Kempe, J. (2007). The power of quantum systems on a line. In Proceedings of the 48th Annual IEEE Symposium on Foundations of Computer Science, FOCS 2007 (pp. 373-383). [4389508] https://doi.org/10.1109/FOCS.2007.4389508

The power of quantum systems on a line. / Aharonov, Dorit; Gottesman, Daniel; Irani, Sandy; Kempe, Julia.

Proceedings of the 48th Annual IEEE Symposium on Foundations of Computer Science, FOCS 2007. 2007. p. 373-383 4389508.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Aharonov, D, Gottesman, D, Irani, S & Kempe, J 2007, The power of quantum systems on a line. in Proceedings of the 48th Annual IEEE Symposium on Foundations of Computer Science, FOCS 2007., 4389508, pp. 373-383, 48th Annual Symposium on Foundations of Computer Science, FOCS 2007, Providence, RI, United States, 10/20/07. https://doi.org/10.1109/FOCS.2007.4389508
Aharonov D, Gottesman D, Irani S, Kempe J. The power of quantum systems on a line. In Proceedings of the 48th Annual IEEE Symposium on Foundations of Computer Science, FOCS 2007. 2007. p. 373-383. 4389508 https://doi.org/10.1109/FOCS.2007.4389508
Aharonov, Dorit ; Gottesman, Daniel ; Irani, Sandy ; Kempe, Julia. / The power of quantum systems on a line. Proceedings of the 48th Annual IEEE Symposium on Foundations of Computer Science, FOCS 2007. 2007. pp. 373-383
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