The power of indifference: Violence, visibility, and invisibility in the New York city race riot of 1900

Martha Hodes

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    In New York City in the summer of 1900, white residents attacked black residents over the course of two days, with the police force at times inciting the violence and joining the mob. What came to be called the New York City race riot of 1900 began on a hot August night in the racially mixed, working-class neighborhood known as “The Tenderloin," or sometimes “Hell’s Kitchen." On the corner of 41st Street and Eighth Avenue, a white man named Robert Thorpe had bothered a black woman named May Enoch, and a black man named Arthur Harris had come to Enoch’s rescue. The white man clubbed the black man, and the black man stabbed his assailant, who turned out to be a police officer patrolling in plainclothes that night. Robert Thorpe had assumed that May Enoch was a prostitute-she had been waiting on the corner for Arthur Harris, with whom she lived-and was about to arrest her. Officer Thorpe died of his stab wounds, and Harris, a recent arrival from Virginia, was subsequently convicted and sentenced to life in prison.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationViolence and Visibility in Modern History
    PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
    Pages73-90
    Number of pages18
    ISBN (Electronic)9781137378699
    ISBN (Print)9781137378682
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

    Fingerprint

    violence
    resident
    police officer
    working class
    correctional institution
    police
    Residents
    Visibility
    Invisibility
    Indifference
    Riots
    Police
    Night
    Working Class
    Prostitutes
    Prison
    Kitchen
    Rescue

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Arts and Humanities(all)
    • Social Sciences(all)

    Cite this

    Hodes, M. (2013). The power of indifference: Violence, visibility, and invisibility in the New York city race riot of 1900. In Violence and Visibility in Modern History (pp. 73-90). Palgrave Macmillan. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137378699_5

    The power of indifference : Violence, visibility, and invisibility in the New York city race riot of 1900. / Hodes, Martha.

    Violence and Visibility in Modern History. Palgrave Macmillan, 2013. p. 73-90.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Hodes, Martha. / The power of indifference : Violence, visibility, and invisibility in the New York city race riot of 1900. Violence and Visibility in Modern History. Palgrave Macmillan, 2013. pp. 73-90
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