The potential for glycemic control monitoring and screening for diabetes at dental visits using oral blood

Shiela M. Strauss, Mary T. Rosedale, Michael A. Pesce, David M. Rindskopf, Navjot Kaur, Caroline M. Juterbock, Mark Wolff, Dolores Malaspina, Ann Danoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. We examined the potential for glycemic control monitoring and screening for diabetes in a dental setting among adults (n = 408) with or at risk for diabetes. Methods. In 2013 and 2014, we performed hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) tests on dried blood samples of gingival crevicular blood and compared these with paired "gold-standard" HbA1c tests with dried finger-stick blood samples in New York City dental clinic patients. We examined differences in sociodemographics and diabetes-related risk and health care characteristics for 3 groups of at-risk patients. Results. About half of the study sample had elevated HbA1c values in the combined prediabetes and diabetes ranges, with approximately one fourth of those in the diabetes range. With a correlation of 0.991 between gingival crevicular and finger-stick blood HbA1c, measures of concurrence between the tests were extremely high for both elevated HbA1c and diabetes-range HbA1c levels. Persons already diagnosed with diabetes and undiagnosed persons aged 45 years or older could especially benefit from HbA1c testing at dental visits. Conclusions. Gingival crevicular blood collected at the dental visit can be used to screen for diabetes and monitor glycemic control for many at-risk patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)796-801
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume105
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

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Tooth
Hemoglobins
Fingers
Dental Clinics
Prediabetic State
Gold
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Strauss, S. M., Rosedale, M. T., Pesce, M. A., Rindskopf, D. M., Kaur, N., Juterbock, C. M., ... Danoff, A. (2015). The potential for glycemic control monitoring and screening for diabetes at dental visits using oral blood. American Journal of Public Health, 105(4), 796-801. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2014.302357

The potential for glycemic control monitoring and screening for diabetes at dental visits using oral blood. / Strauss, Shiela M.; Rosedale, Mary T.; Pesce, Michael A.; Rindskopf, David M.; Kaur, Navjot; Juterbock, Caroline M.; Wolff, Mark; Malaspina, Dolores; Danoff, Ann.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 105, No. 4, 01.04.2015, p. 796-801.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Strauss, SM, Rosedale, MT, Pesce, MA, Rindskopf, DM, Kaur, N, Juterbock, CM, Wolff, M, Malaspina, D & Danoff, A 2015, 'The potential for glycemic control monitoring and screening for diabetes at dental visits using oral blood', American Journal of Public Health, vol. 105, no. 4, pp. 796-801. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2014.302357
Strauss, Shiela M. ; Rosedale, Mary T. ; Pesce, Michael A. ; Rindskopf, David M. ; Kaur, Navjot ; Juterbock, Caroline M. ; Wolff, Mark ; Malaspina, Dolores ; Danoff, Ann. / The potential for glycemic control monitoring and screening for diabetes at dental visits using oral blood. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2015 ; Vol. 105, No. 4. pp. 796-801.
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