The neo-Marxist legacy in American sociology

Jeffrey Manza, Michael A. McCarthy

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    Abstract

    A significant group of sociologists entering graduate school in the late 1960s and 1970s embraced Marxism as the foundation for a critical challenge to reigning orthodoxies in the discipline. In this review, we ask what impact this cohort of scholars and their students had on the mainstream of American sociology. More generally, how and in what ways did the resurgence of neo-Marxist thought within the discipline lead to new theoretical and empirical research and findings? Using two models of Marxism as science as our guide, we examine the impact of sociological Marxism on research on the state, inequality, the labor process, and global political economy. We conclude with some thoughts about the future of sociological Marxism.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)155-183
    Number of pages29
    JournalAnnual Review of Sociology
    Volume37
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Aug 11 2011

    Fingerprint

    Marxism
    sociology
    school graduate
    sociologist
    empirical research
    political economy
    labor
    science
    Group
    student

    Keywords

    • Capitalism
    • Class
    • Political economy
    • State
    • Work

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Sociology and Political Science

    Cite this

    The neo-Marxist legacy in American sociology. / Manza, Jeffrey; McCarthy, Michael A.

    In: Annual Review of Sociology, Vol. 37, 11.08.2011, p. 155-183.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    Manza, Jeffrey ; McCarthy, Michael A. / The neo-Marxist legacy in American sociology. In: Annual Review of Sociology. 2011 ; Vol. 37. pp. 155-183.
    @article{33fa422e2ef44caeb9ff1a9704dabffe,
    title = "The neo-Marxist legacy in American sociology",
    abstract = "A significant group of sociologists entering graduate school in the late 1960s and 1970s embraced Marxism as the foundation for a critical challenge to reigning orthodoxies in the discipline. In this review, we ask what impact this cohort of scholars and their students had on the mainstream of American sociology. More generally, how and in what ways did the resurgence of neo-Marxist thought within the discipline lead to new theoretical and empirical research and findings? Using two models of Marxism as science as our guide, we examine the impact of sociological Marxism on research on the state, inequality, the labor process, and global political economy. We conclude with some thoughts about the future of sociological Marxism.",
    keywords = "Capitalism, Class, Political economy, State, Work",
    author = "Jeffrey Manza and McCarthy, {Michael A.}",
    year = "2011",
    month = "8",
    day = "11",
    doi = "10.1146/annurev-soc-081309-150145",
    language = "English (US)",
    volume = "37",
    pages = "155--183",
    journal = "Annual Review of Sociology",
    issn = "0360-0572",
    publisher = "Annual Reviews Inc.",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - The neo-Marxist legacy in American sociology

    AU - Manza, Jeffrey

    AU - McCarthy, Michael A.

    PY - 2011/8/11

    Y1 - 2011/8/11

    N2 - A significant group of sociologists entering graduate school in the late 1960s and 1970s embraced Marxism as the foundation for a critical challenge to reigning orthodoxies in the discipline. In this review, we ask what impact this cohort of scholars and their students had on the mainstream of American sociology. More generally, how and in what ways did the resurgence of neo-Marxist thought within the discipline lead to new theoretical and empirical research and findings? Using two models of Marxism as science as our guide, we examine the impact of sociological Marxism on research on the state, inequality, the labor process, and global political economy. We conclude with some thoughts about the future of sociological Marxism.

    AB - A significant group of sociologists entering graduate school in the late 1960s and 1970s embraced Marxism as the foundation for a critical challenge to reigning orthodoxies in the discipline. In this review, we ask what impact this cohort of scholars and their students had on the mainstream of American sociology. More generally, how and in what ways did the resurgence of neo-Marxist thought within the discipline lead to new theoretical and empirical research and findings? Using two models of Marxism as science as our guide, we examine the impact of sociological Marxism on research on the state, inequality, the labor process, and global political economy. We conclude with some thoughts about the future of sociological Marxism.

    KW - Capitalism

    KW - Class

    KW - Political economy

    KW - State

    KW - Work

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79960447527&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79960447527&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1146/annurev-soc-081309-150145

    DO - 10.1146/annurev-soc-081309-150145

    M3 - Review article

    AN - SCOPUS:79960447527

    VL - 37

    SP - 155

    EP - 183

    JO - Annual Review of Sociology

    JF - Annual Review of Sociology

    SN - 0360-0572

    ER -