The near-infrared counterpart of 4U 1636-53

(Research Note)

Dave Russell, K. O'Brien, T. Muñoz-Darias, P. Casella, P. Gandhi, M. G. Revnivtsev

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Context. The optical counterpart of the neutron star X-ray binary and well known X-ray burster, 4U 1636-53 (=4U 1636-536 = V801 Ara) has been studied for three decades. However, no infrared studies have been reported to date. Aims. Our aims are to identify and investigate the near-infrared (NIR) counterpart of 4U 1636-53. Methods. We present deep, K S-band (2.2 μm) imaging of the region of 4U 1636-53 taken with the Infrared Spectrometer And Array Camera (ISAAC) on the Very Large Telescope. Archival optical and UV data were used to infer the 0.2-2.2 μm spectral energy distribution (SED). Results. One star is located at coordinates α = 16:40:55.57, δ =-53:45:05.2 (J2000; 1σ positional uncertainty of ∼0.3 arcsec), which is consistent with the known optical position of 4U 1636-53; its magnitude is K S = 16.14 ± 0.12. This star is also detected in the 2MASS survey in the J-band and has a magnitude of J = 16.65 ±0.22. Assuming that the persistent emission is quite steady, the 0.4-2.2 μm de-reddened SED can be described by a power law F νν 1.5 ± 0.3, with some possible curvature (F νν 1.5) at 0.2-0.4 μm. The SED can be approximated by a blackbody of temperature ∼27000 K. This is typical for an active low-mass X-ray binary, and the emission can be explained by the outer regions of a (likely irradiated) accretion disc. We therefore interpret this K S-band star as the NIR counterpart.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Article numberA53
    JournalAstronomy and Astrophysics
    Volume539
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Feb 29 2012

    Fingerprint

    spectral energy distribution
    near infrared
    S band
    stars
    energy
    x rays
    infrared spectrometers
    accretion disks
    neutron stars
    curvature
    power law
    spectrometer
    cameras
    accretion
    telescopes
    distribution
    temperature

    Keywords

    • Infrared: stars
    • Stars: neutron
    • X-rays: binaries

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Astronomy and Astrophysics
    • Space and Planetary Science

    Cite this

    Russell, D., O'Brien, K., Muñoz-Darias, T., Casella, P., Gandhi, P., & Revnivtsev, M. G. (2012). The near-infrared counterpart of 4U 1636-53: (Research Note). Astronomy and Astrophysics, 539, [A53]. https://doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201118033

    The near-infrared counterpart of 4U 1636-53 : (Research Note). / Russell, Dave; O'Brien, K.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; Casella, P.; Gandhi, P.; Revnivtsev, M. G.

    In: Astronomy and Astrophysics, Vol. 539, A53, 29.02.2012.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Russell, D, O'Brien, K, Muñoz-Darias, T, Casella, P, Gandhi, P & Revnivtsev, MG 2012, 'The near-infrared counterpart of 4U 1636-53: (Research Note)', Astronomy and Astrophysics, vol. 539, A53. https://doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201118033
    Russell D, O'Brien K, Muñoz-Darias T, Casella P, Gandhi P, Revnivtsev MG. The near-infrared counterpart of 4U 1636-53: (Research Note). Astronomy and Astrophysics. 2012 Feb 29;539. A53. https://doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201118033
    Russell, Dave ; O'Brien, K. ; Muñoz-Darias, T. ; Casella, P. ; Gandhi, P. ; Revnivtsev, M. G. / The near-infrared counterpart of 4U 1636-53 : (Research Note). In: Astronomy and Astrophysics. 2012 ; Vol. 539.
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    AU - Muñoz-Darias, T.

    AU - Casella, P.

    AU - Gandhi, P.

    AU - Revnivtsev, M. G.

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    N2 - Context. The optical counterpart of the neutron star X-ray binary and well known X-ray burster, 4U 1636-53 (=4U 1636-536 = V801 Ara) has been studied for three decades. However, no infrared studies have been reported to date. Aims. Our aims are to identify and investigate the near-infrared (NIR) counterpart of 4U 1636-53. Methods. We present deep, K S-band (2.2 μm) imaging of the region of 4U 1636-53 taken with the Infrared Spectrometer And Array Camera (ISAAC) on the Very Large Telescope. Archival optical and UV data were used to infer the 0.2-2.2 μm spectral energy distribution (SED). Results. One star is located at coordinates α = 16:40:55.57, δ =-53:45:05.2 (J2000; 1σ positional uncertainty of ∼0.3 arcsec), which is consistent with the known optical position of 4U 1636-53; its magnitude is K S = 16.14 ± 0.12. This star is also detected in the 2MASS survey in the J-band and has a magnitude of J = 16.65 ±0.22. Assuming that the persistent emission is quite steady, the 0.4-2.2 μm de-reddened SED can be described by a power law F νν 1.5 ± 0.3, with some possible curvature (F νν 1.5) at 0.2-0.4 μm. The SED can be approximated by a blackbody of temperature ∼27000 K. This is typical for an active low-mass X-ray binary, and the emission can be explained by the outer regions of a (likely irradiated) accretion disc. We therefore interpret this K S-band star as the NIR counterpart.

    AB - Context. The optical counterpart of the neutron star X-ray binary and well known X-ray burster, 4U 1636-53 (=4U 1636-536 = V801 Ara) has been studied for three decades. However, no infrared studies have been reported to date. Aims. Our aims are to identify and investigate the near-infrared (NIR) counterpart of 4U 1636-53. Methods. We present deep, K S-band (2.2 μm) imaging of the region of 4U 1636-53 taken with the Infrared Spectrometer And Array Camera (ISAAC) on the Very Large Telescope. Archival optical and UV data were used to infer the 0.2-2.2 μm spectral energy distribution (SED). Results. One star is located at coordinates α = 16:40:55.57, δ =-53:45:05.2 (J2000; 1σ positional uncertainty of ∼0.3 arcsec), which is consistent with the known optical position of 4U 1636-53; its magnitude is K S = 16.14 ± 0.12. This star is also detected in the 2MASS survey in the J-band and has a magnitude of J = 16.65 ±0.22. Assuming that the persistent emission is quite steady, the 0.4-2.2 μm de-reddened SED can be described by a power law F νν 1.5 ± 0.3, with some possible curvature (F νν 1.5) at 0.2-0.4 μm. The SED can be approximated by a blackbody of temperature ∼27000 K. This is typical for an active low-mass X-ray binary, and the emission can be explained by the outer regions of a (likely irradiated) accretion disc. We therefore interpret this K S-band star as the NIR counterpart.

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