The microfluidic probe

Operation and use for localized surface processing

Cecile M. Perrault, Mohammad Qasaimeh, David Juncker

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Microfluidic devices allow assays to be performed using minute amounts of sample and have recently been used to control the microenvironment of cells. Microfluidics is commonly associated with closed microchannels which limit their use to samples that can be introduced, and cultured in the case of cells, within a confined volume. On the other hand, micropipetting system have been used to locally perfuse cells and surfaces, notably using push-pull setups where one pipette acts as source and the other one as sink, but the confinement of the flow is difficult in three dimensions. Furthermore, pipettes are fragile and difficult to position and hence are used in static configuration only.The microfluidic probe (MFP) circumvents the constraints imposed by the construction of closed microfluidic channels and instead of enclosing the sample into the microfluidic system, the microfluidic flow can be directly delivered onto the sample, and scanned across the sample, using the MFP. The injection and aspiration openings are located within a few tens of micrometers of one another so that a microjet injected into the gap is confined by the hydrodynamic forces of the surrounding liquid and entirely aspirated back into the other opening. The microjet can be flushed across the substrate surface and provides a precise tool for localized deposition/delivery of reagents which can be used over large areas by scanning the probe across the surface. In this video we present the microfluidic probe1 (MFP). We explain in detail how to assemble the MFP, mount it atop an inverted microscope, and align it relative to the substrate surface, and finally show how to use it to process a substrate surface immersed in a buffer.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Article numbere1418
    JournalJournal of Visualized Experiments
    Issue number28
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

    Fingerprint

    Microfluidics
    Processing
    Lab-On-A-Chip Devices
    Substrates
    Cellular Microenvironment
    Hydrodynamics
    Microchannels
    Buffers
    Assays
    Microscopes
    Injections
    Scanning
    Liquids

    Keywords

    • Bioengineering
    • Biomems
    • Integrated microfluidic system
    • Issue 28
    • Microfluidics

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Neuroscience(all)
    • Chemical Engineering(all)
    • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
    • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

    Cite this

    The microfluidic probe : Operation and use for localized surface processing. / Perrault, Cecile M.; Qasaimeh, Mohammad; Juncker, David.

    In: Journal of Visualized Experiments, No. 28, e1418, 01.01.2009.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Perrault, Cecile M. ; Qasaimeh, Mohammad ; Juncker, David. / The microfluidic probe : Operation and use for localized surface processing. In: Journal of Visualized Experiments. 2009 ; No. 28.
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