The Malawi Rift and vertebrate paleobiogeography of the African Rift Valley

F. Schrenk, C. Betzler, Timothy Bromage, U. Ring

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Profound early hominid discoveries in South and East Africa have made the geographic center between them - southeast Africa (Malawi, southern Tanzania, Mozambique, southern Zaire, Zambia, northern Zimbabwe) - conspicuous. HCRP research on the Malawi Rift and its paleofaunas has provided knowledge of the continuity and partitioning of the geological and biological realms within this vast region and has resulted in the first early hominid specimen recovered from southeast Africa (attributed to Homo rudolfensis). The emerging picture is that the Malawi Rift was part of an ecological corridor continuous with the East African Rift Valley system, but that connections to the southern ecological domain were more limited. Important questions to be addressed with our geological and paleobiological research concern hypotheses regarding early hominid speciation and dispersion in relation to climate change, habitat (dis)continuity, and geographical attributes of the African Rift Valley.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGeoscientific Research in Northeast Africa
PublisherCRC Press
Pages471-474
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9054103183, 9781351445252
ISBN (Print)9789054103189
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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paleobiogeography
hominid
rift zone
vertebrate
partitioning
climate change
habitat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Schrenk, F., Betzler, C., Bromage, T., & Ring, U. (2017). The Malawi Rift and vertebrate paleobiogeography of the African Rift Valley. In Geoscientific Research in Northeast Africa (pp. 471-474). CRC Press. https://doi.org/10.1201/9780203753392

The Malawi Rift and vertebrate paleobiogeography of the African Rift Valley. / Schrenk, F.; Betzler, C.; Bromage, Timothy; Ring, U.

Geoscientific Research in Northeast Africa. CRC Press, 2017. p. 471-474.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Schrenk, F, Betzler, C, Bromage, T & Ring, U 2017, The Malawi Rift and vertebrate paleobiogeography of the African Rift Valley. in Geoscientific Research in Northeast Africa. CRC Press, pp. 471-474. https://doi.org/10.1201/9780203753392
Schrenk F, Betzler C, Bromage T, Ring U. The Malawi Rift and vertebrate paleobiogeography of the African Rift Valley. In Geoscientific Research in Northeast Africa. CRC Press. 2017. p. 471-474 https://doi.org/10.1201/9780203753392
Schrenk, F. ; Betzler, C. ; Bromage, Timothy ; Ring, U. / The Malawi Rift and vertebrate paleobiogeography of the African Rift Valley. Geoscientific Research in Northeast Africa. CRC Press, 2017. pp. 471-474
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