The libidinal constitution of a high-risk social movement

Affectual ties and solidarity in the Huk rebellion, 1946 to 1954

Jeffrey Goodwin

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    Abstract

    The dominant theoretical paradigms in social-movement research usually neglect the influence of affectual and sexual relationships on collective action. Drawing on the psychoanalytic social theory of Philip Slater (1963, 1977), I employ a "libidinal-economy" perspective to explore the effects of such relationships on the Communist-led Huk rebellion in the Philippines (1946-1954). I argue that effectual relationships eroded the solidarity of this exclusive and high-risk social movement. The libidinal constitution (i.e., the structure and "economy" of the affectual ties) of the Huk movement's predominantly male activists - including cadres of the Communist Party of the Philippines - undermined their collective identity and discipline. The "libidinal opportunity structure" created by these activists' affectual and sexual ties allowed emotional or "libidinal withdrawal" from, and weakened identification with, this insurgency, thereby contributing to its eventual disintegration, I call for a "return of the repressed" within social-movement theory, that is, for the incorporation of sexual and affectual ties into our theoretical perspectives and empirical research.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)53-69
    Number of pages17
    JournalAmerican Sociological Review
    Volume62
    Issue number1
    StatePublished - Feb 1997

    Fingerprint

    social movement
    solidarity
    constitution
    Philippines
    economy
    cadre
    collective identity
    communist party
    collective behavior
    withdrawal
    neglect
    empirical research
    paradigm

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Sociology and Political Science

    Cite this

    The libidinal constitution of a high-risk social movement : Affectual ties and solidarity in the Huk rebellion, 1946 to 1954. / Goodwin, Jeffrey.

    In: American Sociological Review, Vol. 62, No. 1, 02.1997, p. 53-69.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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