The legacy of september 11: Shared trauma, therapeutic intimacy, and professional posttraumatic growth

Carol Tosone

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    This article describes the personal and professional experiences of the author as a result of her direct exposure to the World Trade Center Disaster.The author proposes the use of the term shared trauma to describe the experience of clinicians exposed to the same collective trauma as their clients.Shared trauma can result in the blurring of clinician-client roles and increased clinician self-disclosure and emphasis on the shared nature of the experience.Posttraumatic growth can also occur, including in the professional realm where clinicians develop a renewed appreciation for the value of the profession, learn to initiate greater safeguards in protecting personal time, and gain an intimate understanding of patients' traumatic experiences.The results of her 9/11 research as well as plans for collaborative research in environments characterized by chronic acts of terrorism or exposure to natural disasters are summarized.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)25-29
    Number of pages5
    JournalTraumatology
    Volume17
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Sep 1 2011

    Fingerprint

    Disasters
    Wounds and Injuries
    Growth
    Self Disclosure
    Terrorism
    Research
    Therapeutics

    Keywords

    • human-affected disasters
    • human-caused
    • sources of trauma
    • work-related primary trauma
    • work-related secondary trauma

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Nursing(all)
    • Emergency Medicine
    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

    Cite this

    The legacy of september 11 : Shared trauma, therapeutic intimacy, and professional posttraumatic growth. / Tosone, Carol.

    In: Traumatology, Vol. 17, No. 3, 01.09.2011, p. 25-29.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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