The intersection of extreme poverty and familial mental health in the United States

Mary C. Acri, Lindsay A. Bornheimer, Lauren Jessell, Aminda Heckman, Joshua G. Adler, Geetha Gopalan, Mary M. McKay

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Approximately 22% of children in the United States live in poverty, with high rates of caregiver depression and child disruptive behavior disorders (DBD). The current study aims to explore the relationships between living in extreme poverty and both child and parent mental health. Data are comprised of findings from the first effectiveness study of the 4Rs and 2Ss intervention, in addition to preliminary data from an implementation study currently underway (n = 484). Families with an annual income of less than $9,999 reported significantly greater child DBD scores and prevalence of clinically significant levels of caregiver depressive symptoms compared to income levels over $10,000. Findings support the recommendation for parental mental health to be attended to within the context of child mental health services.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)677-688
    Number of pages12
    JournalSocial Work in Mental Health
    Volume15
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Nov 2 2017

    Fingerprint

    Child Behavior Disorders
    Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders
    Poverty
    Caregivers
    Mental Health
    mental health
    Child Health Services
    poverty
    Depression
    Mental Health Services
    behavior disorder
    caregiver
    income
    health service
    parents

    Keywords

    • 4Rs and 2Ss for strengthening families
    • caregiver depression
    • disruptive behavior disorders
    • extreme poverty

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

    Cite this

    Acri, M. C., Bornheimer, L. A., Jessell, L., Heckman, A., Adler, J. G., Gopalan, G., & McKay, M. M. (2017). The intersection of extreme poverty and familial mental health in the United States. Social Work in Mental Health, 15(6), 677-688. https://doi.org/10.1080/15332985.2017.1319893

    The intersection of extreme poverty and familial mental health in the United States. / Acri, Mary C.; Bornheimer, Lindsay A.; Jessell, Lauren; Heckman, Aminda; Adler, Joshua G.; Gopalan, Geetha; McKay, Mary M.

    In: Social Work in Mental Health, Vol. 15, No. 6, 02.11.2017, p. 677-688.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Acri, MC, Bornheimer, LA, Jessell, L, Heckman, A, Adler, JG, Gopalan, G & McKay, MM 2017, 'The intersection of extreme poverty and familial mental health in the United States', Social Work in Mental Health, vol. 15, no. 6, pp. 677-688. https://doi.org/10.1080/15332985.2017.1319893
    Acri, Mary C. ; Bornheimer, Lindsay A. ; Jessell, Lauren ; Heckman, Aminda ; Adler, Joshua G. ; Gopalan, Geetha ; McKay, Mary M. / The intersection of extreme poverty and familial mental health in the United States. In: Social Work in Mental Health. 2017 ; Vol. 15, No. 6. pp. 677-688.
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