The interplay of public health law and industry self-regulation: The case of sugar-sweetened beverage sales in schools

Michelle M. Mello, Jennifer Pomeranz, Patricia Moran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

It is increasingly recognized that sugar-sweetened beverage consumption contributes to childhood obesity. Most states have adopted laws that regulate the availability of sugarsweetened beverages in school settings. However, such policies have encountered resistance from consumer and parent groups, as well as the beverage industry. The beverage industry's recent adoption of voluntary guidelines, which call for the curtailment of sugar-sweetened beverage sales in schools, raises the question, Is further policy intervention in this area needed, and if so, what form should it take? We examine the interplay of public and private regulation of sugar-sweetened beverage sales in schools, by drawing on a 50-state legal and regulatory analysis and a review of industry self-regulation initiatives.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)595-604
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume98
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2008

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Beverages
Industry
Public Health
Pediatric Obesity
Guidelines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

The interplay of public health law and industry self-regulation : The case of sugar-sweetened beverage sales in schools. / Mello, Michelle M.; Pomeranz, Jennifer; Moran, Patricia.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 98, No. 4, 01.04.2008, p. 595-604.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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