The influence of executive functions and memory on self-generation benefit in persons with multiple sclerosis

Yael Goverover, Nancy Chiaravalloti, John Deluca

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: Self-generation is a learning strategy, demonstrated to improve learning in healthy persons as well as persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). This study examines the relative influence of memory performance and executive functioning on the ability to benefit from self-generated learning in persons with MS. Method: Participants consisted of 70 individuals with MS. A within-groups design was employed examining recall of words that were presented in two learning conditions: (a) a condition in which the to-be-learned information was provided to the participant and (b) a condition in which the to-be-learned information was self-generated by the participant. Participants were divided into 2 groups based on their benefit from self-generation. Participants who benefited from using self-generation strategy were included in the responders group, and participants who did not benefit from using self-generation were included in the nonresponders group. Executive functions were assessed with the D-KEFS (Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System) Sorting Test, and learning and memory were assessed via the Open-Trial Selective Reminding Test and the Brief Visual Spatial Memory Test-Revised. Results: Responders had significantly better executive functions than nonresponders, while no significant differences were noted between the 2 groups on memory abilities. Logistic regression analysis revealed that performance on the executive functioning task significantly predicted benefit from self-generation. Conclusions: Executive functioning is critical for the ability of an individual with MS to benefit from self-generation strategy use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)775-783
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Volume35
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 19 2013

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Executive Function
Multiple Sclerosis
Learning
Aptitude
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • Cognitive rehabilitation
  • Executive functions
  • Memory
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Strategy use
  • self-generation
  • learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

The influence of executive functions and memory on self-generation benefit in persons with multiple sclerosis. / Goverover, Yael; Chiaravalloti, Nancy; Deluca, John.

In: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, Vol. 35, No. 7, 19.08.2013, p. 775-783.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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