The influence of employee, job/task, and organizational factors on adherence to universal precautions among nurses

David M. Dejoy, Lawrence R. Murphy, Robyn Gershon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Universal precautions (UP) refer to recommended work practices designed to help prevent occupational exposure to HIV/AIDS and other blood-borne pathogens in health care settings. However, despite widespread dissemination of UP guidelines and subsequent government regulatory action, worker adherence remains less than satisfactory. The present study used hierarchical, multiple regression analysis to examine the relative influence of four sets of factors on worker adherence to UP: demographics, personal characteristics, job/task factors, and organization-level factors. Data were analyzed on a sample of 451 nurses employed at a large U.S. medical center. Consistent with the general hypothesis of the study, job/task and organization-level factors were the best predictors of adherence. Using the results from the study, a heuristic model of the adherence process is proposed that highlights the contributions of job hindrances and organizational safety climate to UP-related behavior. A three-pronged intervention strategy is also presented that emphasizes (1) the availability and accessibility of personal protective devices, (2) the reduction of UP-related job hindrances and barriers, and (3) improvements in safety performance feedback and related communications. Given the preliminary nature of this study, several recommendations for future research are also offered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-55
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Industrial Ergonomics
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

Fingerprint

Universal Precautions
nurse
Nurses
employee
Personnel
Pathogens
Health care
Regression analysis
worker
organization
job characteristics
Blood
Availability
intervention strategy
Feedback
Blood-Borne Pathogens
Organizations
heuristics
Communication
Protective Devices

Keywords

  • HIV/AIDS
  • Job characteristics
  • Organizational factors
  • Safety climate
  • Universal precautions
  • Worker protection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

The influence of employee, job/task, and organizational factors on adherence to universal precautions among nurses. / Dejoy, David M.; Murphy, Lawrence R.; Gershon, Robyn.

In: International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, Vol. 16, No. 1, 01.01.1995, p. 43-55.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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