The in vitro selection world

Kenan Jijakli, Basel Khraiwesh, Weiqi Fu, Liming Luo, Amnah Alzahmi, Joseph Koussa, Amphun Chaiboonchoe, Serdal Kirmizialtin, Laising Yen, Kourosh Salehi-Ashtiani

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    Abstract

    Through iterative cycles of selection, amplification, and mutagenesis, in vitro selection provides the ability to isolate molecules of desired properties and function from large pools (libraries) of random molecules with as many as 1016 distinct species. This review, in recognition of a quarter of century of scientific discoveries made through in vitro selection, starts with a brief overview of the method and its history. It further covers recent developments in in vitro selection with a focus on tools that enhance the capabilities of in vitro selection and its expansion from being purely a nucleic acids selection to that of polypeptides and proteins. In addition, we cover how next generation sequencing and modern biological computational tools are being used to complement in vitro selection experiments. On the very least, sequencing and computational tools can translate the large volume of information associated with in vitro selection experiments to manageable, analyzable, and exploitable information. Finally, in vivo selection is briefly compared and contrasted to in vitro selection to highlight the unique capabilities of each method.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)3-13
    Number of pages11
    JournalMethods
    Volume106
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Aug 15 2016

    Fingerprint

    Mutagenesis
    Molecules
    Nucleic Acids
    Amplification
    Experiments
    Peptides
    In Vitro Techniques
    Proteins
    Libraries
    History

    Keywords

    • Aptamer
    • In silico
    • In vitro selection
    • In vivo
    • Next generation sequencing
    • Phage display
    • RNA ligands
    • SELEX

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Molecular Biology
    • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
    • Medicine(all)

    Cite this

    Jijakli, K., Khraiwesh, B., Fu, W., Luo, L., Alzahmi, A., Koussa, J., ... Salehi-Ashtiani, K. (2016). The in vitro selection world. Methods, 106, 3-13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ymeth.2016.06.003

    The in vitro selection world. / Jijakli, Kenan; Khraiwesh, Basel; Fu, Weiqi; Luo, Liming; Alzahmi, Amnah; Koussa, Joseph; Chaiboonchoe, Amphun; Kirmizialtin, Serdal; Yen, Laising; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh.

    In: Methods, Vol. 106, 15.08.2016, p. 3-13.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    Jijakli, K, Khraiwesh, B, Fu, W, Luo, L, Alzahmi, A, Koussa, J, Chaiboonchoe, A, Kirmizialtin, S, Yen, L & Salehi-Ashtiani, K 2016, 'The in vitro selection world', Methods, vol. 106, pp. 3-13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ymeth.2016.06.003
    Jijakli K, Khraiwesh B, Fu W, Luo L, Alzahmi A, Koussa J et al. The in vitro selection world. Methods. 2016 Aug 15;106:3-13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ymeth.2016.06.003
    Jijakli, Kenan ; Khraiwesh, Basel ; Fu, Weiqi ; Luo, Liming ; Alzahmi, Amnah ; Koussa, Joseph ; Chaiboonchoe, Amphun ; Kirmizialtin, Serdal ; Yen, Laising ; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh. / The in vitro selection world. In: Methods. 2016 ; Vol. 106. pp. 3-13.
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