The impact of school reform on student performance evidence

Amy Ellen Schwartz, Leanna Stiefel, Dae Yeop Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper evaluates the impact of the New York Networks for School Renewal Project, a whole school reform initiated by the Annenberg Foundation as part of a nationwide reform strategy. It uses data on students in randomly chosen control schools to estimate impacts on student achievement, using an intent-to-treat design. After controlling for student demographic, mobility, and school characteristics, the authors find positive impacts for students attending reform schools in the fourth Grade, mixed evidence for fifth Grade, and slight to no evidence for sixth Grade. On average, there is a small positive impact. The paper illustrates how relatively inexpensive administrative data can be used to evaluate education reforms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)500-522
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Human Resources
Volume39
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 2004

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Students
Education
School reform
Student performance
Demographics
Administrative data
Student achievement
Renewal
Education reform

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

The impact of school reform on student performance evidence. / Schwartz, Amy Ellen; Stiefel, Leanna; Kim, Dae Yeop.

In: Journal of Human Resources, Vol. 39, No. 2, 03.2004, p. 500-522.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schwartz, Amy Ellen ; Stiefel, Leanna ; Kim, Dae Yeop. / The impact of school reform on student performance evidence. In: Journal of Human Resources. 2004 ; Vol. 39, No. 2. pp. 500-522.
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