The health care system under French national health insurance

Lessons for health reform in the United States

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

The French health system combines universal coverage with a public-private mix of hospital and ambulatory care and a higher volume of service provision than in the United States. Although the system is far from perfect, its indicators of health status and consumer satisfaction are high; its expenditures, as a share of gross domestic product, are far lower than in the United States; and patients have an extraordinary degree of choice among providers. Lessons for the United States include the importance of government's role in providing a statutory framework for universal health insurance; recognition that piecemeal reform can broaden a partial program (like Medicare) to cover, eventually, the entire population; and understanding that universal coverage can be achieved without excluding private insurers from the supplementary insurance market.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-37
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume93
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

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National Health Programs
Universal Coverage
Delivery of Health Care
Health
Health Status Indicators
Gross Domestic Product
Insurance Carriers
Private Hospitals
Health Insurance
Ambulatory Care
Health Expenditures
Medicare
Insurance
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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