The Grand Challenge of Reducing Gender and Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Service Access and Needs Among Adults with Alcohol Misuse

Jennifer I. Manuel

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    This study examined the impact of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) on gender and racial and ethnic disparities in accessing and using behavioral health services among a national sample of adults who reported heavy or binge alcohol use (n = 52,496) and those with alcohol use disorder (AUD; n = 22,966). Difference-in-differences models estimated service-related disparities before (2008–2009) and after (2011–2014) health care reform. A subanalysis was conducted before (2011–2013) and after (2014) full implementation of the ACA. Asian subgroups among respondents with heavy or binge drinking were excluded from substance use disorder (SUD) treatment and unmet need outcome models due to insufficient cell size. Among heavy or binge drinkers, unmet SUD treatment need decreased among Black women and increased among Black men. Mental health (MH) treatment decreased among Asian men, whereas unmet MH treatment need decreased among Hispanic men. MH treatment increased among Hispanic women with AUD. Although there were improvements in service use and access among Black and Hispanic women and Hispanic men, there were setbacks among Black and Asian men. Implications for social workers are discussed.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)10-35
    Number of pages26
    JournalJournal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions
    Volume17
    Issue number1-2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Apr 3 2017

    Fingerprint

    Hispanic Americans
    alcohol
    Alcohols
    Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act
    gender
    Mental Health
    mental health
    Substance-Related Disorders
    act
    Binge Drinking
    Therapeutics
    Health Care Reform
    Cell Size
    Health Services
    social worker
    health service
    health care
    reform

    Keywords

    • Affordable Care Act
    • alcohol misuse
    • disparities
    • gender
    • race and ethnicity
    • service use and access

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Health(social science)
    • Rehabilitation

    Cite this

    The Grand Challenge of Reducing Gender and Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Service Access and Needs Among Adults with Alcohol Misuse. / Manuel, Jennifer I.

    In: Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions, Vol. 17, No. 1-2, 03.04.2017, p. 10-35.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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