The Generic/Nongeneric Distinction Influences How Children Interpret New Information About Social Others

Andrei Cimpian, Ellen M. Markman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

These studies investigate how the distinction between generic sentences (e.g., "Boys are good at math") and nongeneric sentences (e.g., "Johnny is good at math") shapes children's social cognition. These sentence types are hypothesized to have different implications about the source and nature of the properties conveyed. Specifically, generics may be more likely to imply that the referred-to properties emerge naturally from an internal source, which may cause these properties to become essentialized. Four experiments (N=269 four-year-olds and undergraduates) confirmed this hypothesis but also suggested that participants only essentialize the information provided in generic form when this construal is consistent with their prior theoretical knowledge. These studies further current understanding of language as a means of learning about others.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)471-492
Number of pages22
JournalChild Development
Volume82
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011

Fingerprint

social cognition
Cognition
Language
Learning
cause
experiment
language
learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

The Generic/Nongeneric Distinction Influences How Children Interpret New Information About Social Others. / Cimpian, Andrei; Markman, Ellen M.

In: Child Development, Vol. 82, No. 2, 03.2011, p. 471-492.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{f793c482926b46a1b694fb3b76fdd6f9,
title = "The Generic/Nongeneric Distinction Influences How Children Interpret New Information About Social Others",
abstract = "These studies investigate how the distinction between generic sentences (e.g., {"}Boys are good at math{"}) and nongeneric sentences (e.g., {"}Johnny is good at math{"}) shapes children's social cognition. These sentence types are hypothesized to have different implications about the source and nature of the properties conveyed. Specifically, generics may be more likely to imply that the referred-to properties emerge naturally from an internal source, which may cause these properties to become essentialized. Four experiments (N=269 four-year-olds and undergraduates) confirmed this hypothesis but also suggested that participants only essentialize the information provided in generic form when this construal is consistent with their prior theoretical knowledge. These studies further current understanding of language as a means of learning about others.",
author = "Andrei Cimpian and Markman, {Ellen M.}",
year = "2011",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01525.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "82",
pages = "471--492",
journal = "Child Development",
issn = "0009-3920",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Generic/Nongeneric Distinction Influences How Children Interpret New Information About Social Others

AU - Cimpian, Andrei

AU - Markman, Ellen M.

PY - 2011/3

Y1 - 2011/3

N2 - These studies investigate how the distinction between generic sentences (e.g., "Boys are good at math") and nongeneric sentences (e.g., "Johnny is good at math") shapes children's social cognition. These sentence types are hypothesized to have different implications about the source and nature of the properties conveyed. Specifically, generics may be more likely to imply that the referred-to properties emerge naturally from an internal source, which may cause these properties to become essentialized. Four experiments (N=269 four-year-olds and undergraduates) confirmed this hypothesis but also suggested that participants only essentialize the information provided in generic form when this construal is consistent with their prior theoretical knowledge. These studies further current understanding of language as a means of learning about others.

AB - These studies investigate how the distinction between generic sentences (e.g., "Boys are good at math") and nongeneric sentences (e.g., "Johnny is good at math") shapes children's social cognition. These sentence types are hypothesized to have different implications about the source and nature of the properties conveyed. Specifically, generics may be more likely to imply that the referred-to properties emerge naturally from an internal source, which may cause these properties to become essentialized. Four experiments (N=269 four-year-olds and undergraduates) confirmed this hypothesis but also suggested that participants only essentialize the information provided in generic form when this construal is consistent with their prior theoretical knowledge. These studies further current understanding of language as a means of learning about others.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79953012628&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79953012628&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01525.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01525.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 21410911

AN - SCOPUS:79953012628

VL - 82

SP - 471

EP - 492

JO - Child Development

JF - Child Development

SN - 0009-3920

IS - 2

ER -