The fundamental concept of capacity

Roger P. Roess, Elena Prassas

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The initial question is so easy: How big is the bucket? It is, however, deceptive in its simplicity. If the bucket is made out of steel or some other metal, its size and capacity are going to be fixed. A 5-gallon bucket is a 5-gallon bucket all of the time, and will carry a maximum of 5 gallons of liquid. Depending upon its density, however, the weight of 5 gallons of liquid can vary. Now, the question becomes more subtle: How much fluid can be moved from A to B in a 5-gallon bucket?? Depending upon the weight of the liquid and the strength of the carrier, the answer may vary. Perhaps the carrier can only lift a maximum of 50 lbs. If 3 gallons of a particular fluid weighs 50 lbs, that may be the maximum amount that can be moved in the 5-gallon bucket. Is that now its capacity? Then, would a lighter liquid change the capacity of the bucket to higher number (up to 5 gallons)? Now, what if the vessel was not a bucket, but a membrane of some type that was capable of expanding? The capacity might once again be dependent upon the weight and other characteristics of the fluid. Further, when stretched to its limit, the membrane may only remain intact for a few seconds before rupturing. Is the capacity of the membrane that amount of fluid in it for a few seconds before it bursts? Perhaps the capacity of the membrane is the maximum amount of fluid that can be retained in the membrane for an extended period of time. But, then, how much time describes a stable situation? Perhaps the issue is not so simple after all.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSpringer Tracts on Transportation and Traffic
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages27-47
Number of pages21
Volume5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Publication series

NameSpringer Tracts on Transportation and Traffic
Volume5
ISSN (Print)2194-8119
ISSN (Electronic)2194-8127

Fingerprint

membrane
Membranes
Fluids
fluid
liquid
Liquids
vessel
steel
Membrane
Steel
metal
Metals
time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transportation
  • Urban Studies
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

Roess, R. P., & Prassas, E. (2014). The fundamental concept of capacity. In Springer Tracts on Transportation and Traffic (Vol. 5, pp. 27-47). (Springer Tracts on Transportation and Traffic; Vol. 5). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-05786-6_2

The fundamental concept of capacity. / Roess, Roger P.; Prassas, Elena.

Springer Tracts on Transportation and Traffic. Vol. 5 Springer International Publishing, 2014. p. 27-47 (Springer Tracts on Transportation and Traffic; Vol. 5).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Roess, RP & Prassas, E 2014, The fundamental concept of capacity. in Springer Tracts on Transportation and Traffic. vol. 5, Springer Tracts on Transportation and Traffic, vol. 5, Springer International Publishing, pp. 27-47. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-05786-6_2
Roess RP, Prassas E. The fundamental concept of capacity. In Springer Tracts on Transportation and Traffic. Vol. 5. Springer International Publishing. 2014. p. 27-47. (Springer Tracts on Transportation and Traffic). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-05786-6_2
Roess, Roger P. ; Prassas, Elena. / The fundamental concept of capacity. Springer Tracts on Transportation and Traffic. Vol. 5 Springer International Publishing, 2014. pp. 27-47 (Springer Tracts on Transportation and Traffic).
@inbook{b4d72ae4f189426792c845276169d0e6,
title = "The fundamental concept of capacity",
abstract = "The initial question is so easy: How big is the bucket? It is, however, deceptive in its simplicity. If the bucket is made out of steel or some other metal, its size and capacity are going to be fixed. A 5-gallon bucket is a 5-gallon bucket all of the time, and will carry a maximum of 5 gallons of liquid. Depending upon its density, however, the weight of 5 gallons of liquid can vary. Now, the question becomes more subtle: How much fluid can be moved from A to B in a 5-gallon bucket?? Depending upon the weight of the liquid and the strength of the carrier, the answer may vary. Perhaps the carrier can only lift a maximum of 50 lbs. If 3 gallons of a particular fluid weighs 50 lbs, that may be the maximum amount that can be moved in the 5-gallon bucket. Is that now its capacity? Then, would a lighter liquid change the capacity of the bucket to higher number (up to 5 gallons)? Now, what if the vessel was not a bucket, but a membrane of some type that was capable of expanding? The capacity might once again be dependent upon the weight and other characteristics of the fluid. Further, when stretched to its limit, the membrane may only remain intact for a few seconds before rupturing. Is the capacity of the membrane that amount of fluid in it for a few seconds before it bursts? Perhaps the capacity of the membrane is the maximum amount of fluid that can be retained in the membrane for an extended period of time. But, then, how much time describes a stable situation? Perhaps the issue is not so simple after all.",
author = "Roess, {Roger P.} and Elena Prassas",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1007/978-3-319-05786-6_2",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5",
series = "Springer Tracts on Transportation and Traffic",
publisher = "Springer International Publishing",
pages = "27--47",
booktitle = "Springer Tracts on Transportation and Traffic",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - The fundamental concept of capacity

AU - Roess, Roger P.

AU - Prassas, Elena

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - The initial question is so easy: How big is the bucket? It is, however, deceptive in its simplicity. If the bucket is made out of steel or some other metal, its size and capacity are going to be fixed. A 5-gallon bucket is a 5-gallon bucket all of the time, and will carry a maximum of 5 gallons of liquid. Depending upon its density, however, the weight of 5 gallons of liquid can vary. Now, the question becomes more subtle: How much fluid can be moved from A to B in a 5-gallon bucket?? Depending upon the weight of the liquid and the strength of the carrier, the answer may vary. Perhaps the carrier can only lift a maximum of 50 lbs. If 3 gallons of a particular fluid weighs 50 lbs, that may be the maximum amount that can be moved in the 5-gallon bucket. Is that now its capacity? Then, would a lighter liquid change the capacity of the bucket to higher number (up to 5 gallons)? Now, what if the vessel was not a bucket, but a membrane of some type that was capable of expanding? The capacity might once again be dependent upon the weight and other characteristics of the fluid. Further, when stretched to its limit, the membrane may only remain intact for a few seconds before rupturing. Is the capacity of the membrane that amount of fluid in it for a few seconds before it bursts? Perhaps the capacity of the membrane is the maximum amount of fluid that can be retained in the membrane for an extended period of time. But, then, how much time describes a stable situation? Perhaps the issue is not so simple after all.

AB - The initial question is so easy: How big is the bucket? It is, however, deceptive in its simplicity. If the bucket is made out of steel or some other metal, its size and capacity are going to be fixed. A 5-gallon bucket is a 5-gallon bucket all of the time, and will carry a maximum of 5 gallons of liquid. Depending upon its density, however, the weight of 5 gallons of liquid can vary. Now, the question becomes more subtle: How much fluid can be moved from A to B in a 5-gallon bucket?? Depending upon the weight of the liquid and the strength of the carrier, the answer may vary. Perhaps the carrier can only lift a maximum of 50 lbs. If 3 gallons of a particular fluid weighs 50 lbs, that may be the maximum amount that can be moved in the 5-gallon bucket. Is that now its capacity? Then, would a lighter liquid change the capacity of the bucket to higher number (up to 5 gallons)? Now, what if the vessel was not a bucket, but a membrane of some type that was capable of expanding? The capacity might once again be dependent upon the weight and other characteristics of the fluid. Further, when stretched to its limit, the membrane may only remain intact for a few seconds before rupturing. Is the capacity of the membrane that amount of fluid in it for a few seconds before it bursts? Perhaps the capacity of the membrane is the maximum amount of fluid that can be retained in the membrane for an extended period of time. But, then, how much time describes a stable situation? Perhaps the issue is not so simple after all.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85019437195&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85019437195&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/978-3-319-05786-6_2

DO - 10.1007/978-3-319-05786-6_2

M3 - Chapter

VL - 5

T3 - Springer Tracts on Transportation and Traffic

SP - 27

EP - 47

BT - Springer Tracts on Transportation and Traffic

PB - Springer International Publishing

ER -