The first week after drug treatment: The influence of treatment on drug use among women offenders

S. M. Strauss, G. P. Falkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Over the last decade, there has been a dramatic rise in the number of women arrested for drug offenses, and many have serious drug abuse problems. Increasingly, these women have been mandated to drug treatment, often in community-based settings. This article examines the impact of the treatment programs on the short-term posttreatment drug use of women offenders (N = 165) leaving two community-based treatment programs in Portland, Oregon. Our analyses indicate that women who abstained from drug use during the first week after treatment were more likely than those who used drugs during this time to have remained in treatment longer, received a plan to make a successful transition out of treatment, avoided associations with other drug users after leaving treatment, and obtained encouragement from individuals and groups in support of abstinence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)241-264
Number of pages24
JournalAmerican Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

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Pharmaceutical Preparations
Therapeutics
Drug Users
Substance-Related Disorders

Keywords

  • Abstinence
  • Drug treatment
  • Relapse
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

The first week after drug treatment : The influence of treatment on drug use among women offenders. / Strauss, S. M.; Falkin, G. P.

In: American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, Vol. 27, No. 2, 2001, p. 241-264.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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