The First Steps in Drosophila Motion Detection

Nina Vogt, Claude Desplan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The visual system, with its ability to perceive motion, is crucial for most animals to walk or fly steadily. Theoretical models of motion detection exist, but the underlying cellular mechanisms are still poorly understood. In this issue of Neuron, Rister and colleagues dissect the function of neuronal subtypes in the optic lobe of Drosophila to reveal their role in motion detection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5-7
Number of pages3
JournalNeuron
Volume56
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 4 2007

Fingerprint

Drosophila
Theoretical Models
Neurons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

The First Steps in Drosophila Motion Detection. / Vogt, Nina; Desplan, Claude.

In: Neuron, Vol. 56, No. 1, 04.10.2007, p. 5-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vogt, Nina ; Desplan, Claude. / The First Steps in Drosophila Motion Detection. In: Neuron. 2007 ; Vol. 56, No. 1. pp. 5-7.
@article{ae21c631e565425aa1315866577408a1,
title = "The First Steps in Drosophila Motion Detection",
abstract = "The visual system, with its ability to perceive motion, is crucial for most animals to walk or fly steadily. Theoretical models of motion detection exist, but the underlying cellular mechanisms are still poorly understood. In this issue of Neuron, Rister and colleagues dissect the function of neuronal subtypes in the optic lobe of Drosophila to reveal their role in motion detection.",
author = "Nina Vogt and Claude Desplan",
year = "2007",
month = "10",
day = "4",
doi = "10.1016/j.neuron.2007.09.025",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "56",
pages = "5--7",
journal = "Neuron",
issn = "0896-6273",
publisher = "Cell Press",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The First Steps in Drosophila Motion Detection

AU - Vogt, Nina

AU - Desplan, Claude

PY - 2007/10/4

Y1 - 2007/10/4

N2 - The visual system, with its ability to perceive motion, is crucial for most animals to walk or fly steadily. Theoretical models of motion detection exist, but the underlying cellular mechanisms are still poorly understood. In this issue of Neuron, Rister and colleagues dissect the function of neuronal subtypes in the optic lobe of Drosophila to reveal their role in motion detection.

AB - The visual system, with its ability to perceive motion, is crucial for most animals to walk or fly steadily. Theoretical models of motion detection exist, but the underlying cellular mechanisms are still poorly understood. In this issue of Neuron, Rister and colleagues dissect the function of neuronal subtypes in the optic lobe of Drosophila to reveal their role in motion detection.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34748849527&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34748849527&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.neuron.2007.09.025

DO - 10.1016/j.neuron.2007.09.025

M3 - Article

VL - 56

SP - 5

EP - 7

JO - Neuron

JF - Neuron

SN - 0896-6273

IS - 1

ER -