The first global recession in decades

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper uses monthly data on industrial production to estimate the distribution of international business cycle correlations since the 1980s, with a focus on the current turmoil. The degree of international correlation in national business cycles since the end of 2008 is unprecedented in three decades. Since December 2008, there has been a sizable and significant upward shift in the cross-sectional distribution of cycles synchronization, especially between advanced economies. The magnitude of the shift is unprecedented in recent history, even relative to what happened following 1973 after alternative shocks with worldwide consequences. The shift does not arise because volatilities changed with the crisis. Both goods and assets trade have contributed to this synchronization. The (large and significant) synchronization among OECD economies is associated with financial openness. The (weaker) diffusion among developing economies tends to happen between trade partners.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)327-354
Number of pages28
JournalIMF Economic Review
Volume58
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

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Synchronization
Global recession
International business cycles
Developing economies
Business cycles
Financial openness
Industrial production
Assets

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)

Cite this

The first global recession in decades. / Imbs, Jean.

In: IMF Economic Review, Vol. 58, No. 2, 01.01.2010, p. 327-354.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Imbs, Jean. / The first global recession in decades. In: IMF Economic Review. 2010 ; Vol. 58, No. 2. pp. 327-354.
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