The evolution of value systems: A Review Sessay on Ian Morris's foragers, farmers, and fossil fuel

Alberto Bisin

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    Abstract

    Foragers, Farmers, and Fossil Fuels: How Human Values Evolve is a large-scale history of the world through the different modes of production humanity has adopted over time and their implications in terms of moral values. Morris argues that the predominant value systems of human societies are cultural adaptations to the organizational structures of the societies themselves, their institutions, and ultimately to their modes of production. In particular, the book contains a careful analysis of how the hunting-gathering mode of production induces egalitarian values and relatively favorable attitudes toward violent resolution of conflicts, while farming induces hierarchical values and less favorable attitudes toward violence, and in turn the fossil fuel (that is, industrial) mode of production induces egalitarian values and nonviolent attitudes. The narrative in the book is rich, diverse, and ultimately entertaining. Morris's analysis is very knowledgeable and informative: Arguments and evidence are rooted in history, anthropology, archeology, and social sciences in general. Nonetheless, the analysis falls short of being convincing about the causal nature of the existing relationship between modes of production and moral value systems.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1122-1135
    Number of pages14
    JournalJournal of Economic Literature
    Volume55
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

    Fingerprint

    Farmers
    Fossil fuels
    Value systems
    Moral values
    Human values
    Hunting
    Archaeology
    Organizational structure
    Farming
    Anthropology
    Social sciences
    Cultural adaptation

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Economics and Econometrics

    Cite this

    The evolution of value systems : A Review Sessay on Ian Morris's foragers, farmers, and fossil fuel. / Bisin, Alberto.

    In: Journal of Economic Literature, Vol. 55, No. 3, 01.09.2017, p. 1122-1135.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    @article{550db63026314599ba49f0597d035d14,
    title = "The evolution of value systems: A Review Sessay on Ian Morris's foragers, farmers, and fossil fuel",
    abstract = "Foragers, Farmers, and Fossil Fuels: How Human Values Evolve is a large-scale history of the world through the different modes of production humanity has adopted over time and their implications in terms of moral values. Morris argues that the predominant value systems of human societies are cultural adaptations to the organizational structures of the societies themselves, their institutions, and ultimately to their modes of production. In particular, the book contains a careful analysis of how the hunting-gathering mode of production induces egalitarian values and relatively favorable attitudes toward violent resolution of conflicts, while farming induces hierarchical values and less favorable attitudes toward violence, and in turn the fossil fuel (that is, industrial) mode of production induces egalitarian values and nonviolent attitudes. The narrative in the book is rich, diverse, and ultimately entertaining. Morris's analysis is very knowledgeable and informative: Arguments and evidence are rooted in history, anthropology, archeology, and social sciences in general. Nonetheless, the analysis falls short of being convincing about the causal nature of the existing relationship between modes of production and moral value systems.",
    author = "Alberto Bisin",
    year = "2017",
    month = "9",
    day = "1",
    doi = "10.1257/jel.20151352",
    language = "English (US)",
    volume = "55",
    pages = "1122--1135",
    journal = "Journal of Economic Literature",
    issn = "0022-0515",
    publisher = "American Economic Association",
    number = "3",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - The evolution of value systems

    T2 - A Review Sessay on Ian Morris's foragers, farmers, and fossil fuel

    AU - Bisin, Alberto

    PY - 2017/9/1

    Y1 - 2017/9/1

    N2 - Foragers, Farmers, and Fossil Fuels: How Human Values Evolve is a large-scale history of the world through the different modes of production humanity has adopted over time and their implications in terms of moral values. Morris argues that the predominant value systems of human societies are cultural adaptations to the organizational structures of the societies themselves, their institutions, and ultimately to their modes of production. In particular, the book contains a careful analysis of how the hunting-gathering mode of production induces egalitarian values and relatively favorable attitudes toward violent resolution of conflicts, while farming induces hierarchical values and less favorable attitudes toward violence, and in turn the fossil fuel (that is, industrial) mode of production induces egalitarian values and nonviolent attitudes. The narrative in the book is rich, diverse, and ultimately entertaining. Morris's analysis is very knowledgeable and informative: Arguments and evidence are rooted in history, anthropology, archeology, and social sciences in general. Nonetheless, the analysis falls short of being convincing about the causal nature of the existing relationship between modes of production and moral value systems.

    AB - Foragers, Farmers, and Fossil Fuels: How Human Values Evolve is a large-scale history of the world through the different modes of production humanity has adopted over time and their implications in terms of moral values. Morris argues that the predominant value systems of human societies are cultural adaptations to the organizational structures of the societies themselves, their institutions, and ultimately to their modes of production. In particular, the book contains a careful analysis of how the hunting-gathering mode of production induces egalitarian values and relatively favorable attitudes toward violent resolution of conflicts, while farming induces hierarchical values and less favorable attitudes toward violence, and in turn the fossil fuel (that is, industrial) mode of production induces egalitarian values and nonviolent attitudes. The narrative in the book is rich, diverse, and ultimately entertaining. Morris's analysis is very knowledgeable and informative: Arguments and evidence are rooted in history, anthropology, archeology, and social sciences in general. Nonetheless, the analysis falls short of being convincing about the causal nature of the existing relationship between modes of production and moral value systems.

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85029383726&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85029383726&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1257/jel.20151352

    DO - 10.1257/jel.20151352

    M3 - Review article

    AN - SCOPUS:85029383726

    VL - 55

    SP - 1122

    EP - 1135

    JO - Journal of Economic Literature

    JF - Journal of Economic Literature

    SN - 0022-0515

    IS - 3

    ER -