The ELAV family of RNA-binding proteins in synaptic plasticity and long-term memory

Anastasios A. Mirisis, Thomas Carew

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The mechanisms of de novo gene expression and translation of specific gene transcripts have long been known to support long-lasting changes in synaptic plasticity and behavioral long-term memory. In recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that gene expression is heavily regulated not only on the level of transcription, but also through post-transcriptional gene regulation, which governs the subcellular localization, stability, and likelihood of translation of mRNAs. Specific families of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) bind transcripts which contain AU-rich elements (AREs) within their 3′ UTR and thereby govern their downstream fate. These post-transcriptional gene regulatory mechanisms are coordinated through the same cell signaling pathways that play critical roles in long-term memory formation. In this review, we discuss recent results that demonstrate the roles that these ARE-binding proteins play in LTM formation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)143-148
Number of pages6
JournalNeurobiology of Learning and Memory
Volume161
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

Fingerprint

AU Rich Elements
Neuronal Plasticity
RNA-Binding Proteins
Long-Term Memory
Gene Expression
Critical Pathways
Protein Biosynthesis
3' Untranslated Regions
Regulator Genes
Genes
Carrier Proteins

Keywords

  • AU-rich elements
  • ELAV
  • Hu
  • Long-term memory
  • Post-transcriptional regulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

The ELAV family of RNA-binding proteins in synaptic plasticity and long-term memory. / Mirisis, Anastasios A.; Carew, Thomas.

In: Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, Vol. 161, 01.05.2019, p. 143-148.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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