The efficacy of exercise as an aid for smoking cessation in women

A randomized controlled trial

Bess H. Marcus, Anna E. Albrecht, Teresa K. King, Alfred F. Parisi, Bernardine M. Pinto, Mary Roberts, Raymond Niaura, David Abrams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Smoking prevalence rates among women are declining at a slower rate than among men. Objective: To determine if exercise, a healthful alternative to smoking, enhances the achievement and maintenance of smoking cessation. Methods: Two hundred eighty-one healthy, sedentary female smokers were randomly assigned to either a cognitive-behavioral smoking cessation program with vigorous exercise (exercise) or to the same program with equal staff contact time (control). Subjects participated in a 12-session, group- based smoking cessation program. Additionally, exercise subjects were required to attend 3 supervised exercise sessions per week and control subjects were required to participate in 3 supervised health education lectures per week. Abstinence from smoking was based on self-report, was verified by saliva cotinine level, and was measured at 1 week after quit day (week 5), end of treatment (week 12), and 3 and 12 months later (20 and 60 weeks after quit day, respectively). Results: Compared with control subjects (n = 147), exercise subjects (n = 134) achieved significantly higher levels of continuous abstinence at the end of treatment (19.4% vs 10.2%, P = .03) and 3 months (16.4% vs 8.2%, P = .03) and 12 months (11.9% vs 5.4%, P = .05) following treatment. Exercise subjects had significantly increased functional capacity (estimated VO2 peak, 25 ± 6 to 28 ± 6, P<.01) and had gained less weight by the end of treatment (3.05 vs 5.40 kg, P = .03). Conclusions: Vigorous exercise facilitates short- and longer-term smoking cessation in women when combined with a cognitive-behavioral smoking cessation program. Vigorous exercise improves exercise capacity and delays weight gain following smoking cessation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1229-1234
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume159
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 14 1999

Fingerprint

Smoking Cessation
Randomized Controlled Trials
Exercise
Smoking
Cotinine
Therapeutics
Health Education
Saliva
Self Report
Weight Gain
Maintenance
Weights and Measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

The efficacy of exercise as an aid for smoking cessation in women : A randomized controlled trial. / Marcus, Bess H.; Albrecht, Anna E.; King, Teresa K.; Parisi, Alfred F.; Pinto, Bernardine M.; Roberts, Mary; Niaura, Raymond; Abrams, David.

In: Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 159, No. 11, 14.06.1999, p. 1229-1234.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marcus, Bess H. ; Albrecht, Anna E. ; King, Teresa K. ; Parisi, Alfred F. ; Pinto, Bernardine M. ; Roberts, Mary ; Niaura, Raymond ; Abrams, David. / The efficacy of exercise as an aid for smoking cessation in women : A randomized controlled trial. In: Archives of Internal Medicine. 1999 ; Vol. 159, No. 11. pp. 1229-1234.
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abstract = "Background: Smoking prevalence rates among women are declining at a slower rate than among men. Objective: To determine if exercise, a healthful alternative to smoking, enhances the achievement and maintenance of smoking cessation. Methods: Two hundred eighty-one healthy, sedentary female smokers were randomly assigned to either a cognitive-behavioral smoking cessation program with vigorous exercise (exercise) or to the same program with equal staff contact time (control). Subjects participated in a 12-session, group- based smoking cessation program. Additionally, exercise subjects were required to attend 3 supervised exercise sessions per week and control subjects were required to participate in 3 supervised health education lectures per week. Abstinence from smoking was based on self-report, was verified by saliva cotinine level, and was measured at 1 week after quit day (week 5), end of treatment (week 12), and 3 and 12 months later (20 and 60 weeks after quit day, respectively). Results: Compared with control subjects (n = 147), exercise subjects (n = 134) achieved significantly higher levels of continuous abstinence at the end of treatment (19.4{\%} vs 10.2{\%}, P = .03) and 3 months (16.4{\%} vs 8.2{\%}, P = .03) and 12 months (11.9{\%} vs 5.4{\%}, P = .05) following treatment. Exercise subjects had significantly increased functional capacity (estimated VO2 peak, 25 ± 6 to 28 ± 6, P<.01) and had gained less weight by the end of treatment (3.05 vs 5.40 kg, P = .03). Conclusions: Vigorous exercise facilitates short- and longer-term smoking cessation in women when combined with a cognitive-behavioral smoking cessation program. Vigorous exercise improves exercise capacity and delays weight gain following smoking cessation.",
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