The effects of specialist supply on populations' health: assessing the evidence.

Barbara Starfield, Leiyu Shi, Atul Grover, James Macinko

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Analyses at the county level show lower mortality rates where there are more primary care physicians, but this is not the case for specialist supply. These findings confirm those of previous studies at the state and other levels. Increasing the supply of specialists will not improve the United States' position in population health relative to other industrialized countries, and it is likely to lead to greater disparities in health status and outcomes. Adverse effects from inappropriate or unnecessary specialist use may be responsible for the absence of relationship between specialist supply and mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHealth Affairs
VolumeSuppl Web Exclusives
StatePublished - Jan 2005

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supply
Health
health
Population
evidence
Health Status Disparities
mortality
Mortality
Primary Care Physicians
Developed Countries
health status
physician

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Starfield, B., Shi, L., Grover, A., & Macinko, J. (2005). The effects of specialist supply on populations' health: assessing the evidence. Health Affairs, Suppl Web Exclusives.

The effects of specialist supply on populations' health : assessing the evidence. / Starfield, Barbara; Shi, Leiyu; Grover, Atul; Macinko, James.

In: Health Affairs, Vol. Suppl Web Exclusives, 01.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Starfield, B, Shi, L, Grover, A & Macinko, J 2005, 'The effects of specialist supply on populations' health: assessing the evidence.', Health Affairs, vol. Suppl Web Exclusives.
Starfield B, Shi L, Grover A, Macinko J. The effects of specialist supply on populations' health: assessing the evidence. Health Affairs. 2005 Jan;Suppl Web Exclusives.
Starfield, Barbara ; Shi, Leiyu ; Grover, Atul ; Macinko, James. / The effects of specialist supply on populations' health : assessing the evidence. In: Health Affairs. 2005 ; Vol. Suppl Web Exclusives.
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